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British Fiction, 1800–1829

Charles E. Robinson has just brought to our attention an important new Website entitled "British Fiction, 1800–1829: A Database of Production, Circulation, and Reception."

Produced in Cardiff University’s Centre for Editorial and Intertextual Research, the site "allows users to examine bibliographical records of 2,272 works of fiction written by approximately 900 authors, along with a large number of contemporary materials (including anecdotal records, circulating-library catalogues, newspaper advertisements, reviews, and subscription lists)."

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New Byron Society Websites

The Byron Society of America is pleased to announce two new Websites: one for the Byron Society of America; and the other for the Byron Society Collection at the University of Delaware.

Please go to http://www.english.udel.edu/byron/ where you will find a splash page or gateway to both sites, from each of which you can easily negotiate to the other.

In the Byron Society Website, you will encounter such things as membership benefits and forms, a history of recent Byron papers at the MLA, a list of the first five Leslie A. Marchand Memorial Lectures (with McGann's lecture available in full text and with others to follow, including the wonderful lecture that Romulus Linney delivered this past Friday), and application forms for travel grants for graduate students.

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Call for Papers: BARS 2005

FINAL CALL FOR PAPERS
BARS: The British Association for Romantic Studies Biennial Conference
deadline October 15, 2004

ROMANTICISM'S DEBATABLE LANDS
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/bars2005/
28-31 July 2005
University of Newcastle
Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

The phrase 'Debatable Lands' has been used in reference to disputed parts of the Anglo-Scottish Border since at least the sixteenth century. Popularised by Walter Scott, the term was extended to other geographical areas and into metaphorical use in the nineteenth century. Macaulay in 1828 described history as the "debatable land" between Reason and Imagination. The BARS conference of 2005 invites an assessment of Romanticism's Debatable Lands in the fullest and broadest senses of the phrase.

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SWIRL Symposium in Bristol

The first SWIRL symposium will be held in Bristol at the University of Bristol, on Friday 29 October 2004.

http://www.bris.ac.uk/romanticstudies/swirl

The South West Interdisciplinary Romanticism Link (SWIRL) has three aims: to strengthen a network of scholars working on different aspects of the period 1750-1850, to facilitate debate across the disciplines, and to boost the profile of Romantic studies in the region. We envisage a forum in which academics from the South West and beyond could explore the intellectual and professional challenges that currently energise our field.

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New Edition at Romantic Circles: British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism

Romantic Circles is very pleased to announce the publication of British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism: 1793-1815 by Betty T. Bennett, digital text edited by Orianne Smith.

http://www.rc.umd.edu/editions/warpoetry/

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New Play: The Bride of Prejudice

This announcement of a new play about Byron just appeared online:

Announcing the world premiere of The Bride of Prejudice: The Marriage of Lord Byron, a new play by Peter Dunne, running Tuesday 5 October-Sunday 24 October; Tuesdays-Sundays (7:45pm) at Barons Court Theatre, 28A Comeragh Road, London, W14 9RH (Nearest Station Baron's Court/West Kensington--Piccadilly and District Lines) Admission: £12 (Concs.£10)

Box Office 020 8932 4747

Following the success of The Remarkable Piety of The Infamous, Peter Dunne's hilarious and unforgettable production about Oscar Wilde in Paris, Primrose Productions return to Baron's Court Theatre with his new play, Bride of Prejudice, the story of Lord Byron's marriage.

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New at Romantic Circles: Wat Tyler

Romantic Circles is very pleased to announce a new electronic edition of Robert Southey's historical dramatic poem about the 1382 Peasants' Rebellion, Wat Tyler. This important play was written in 1794, at an important moment politically, but remained unpublished until 1817, when a series of pirated editions appeared, printed by publishers intent on embarrassing the now-Poet Laureate Southey.

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