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Holmes to edit Gilchrist on Blake

Gilchrist on Blake, a new edition of the 1863 Life of William Blake by Alexander Gilchrist, will be published by Harper Collins in August, edited by biographer Richard Holmes.

This is from the description on the Harper Collins Website:

. . . the first biography of William Blake ever written, at a time when the great visionary poet and painter was generally forgotten, ridiculed or dismissed as insane. Wonderfully vivid and outspoken (one chapter is entitled ‘Mad or Not Mad’), it was based on revealing interviews with many of Blake’s surviving friends. . . . Gilchrist adds detailed descriptions of Blake’s beliefs and working methods, an account of his trial for high treason and fascinating evocations of the places in London, Kent and Sussex where he lived. The book transformed Blake’s reputation.

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Blue Plaque unveiled for Mary Wollstonecraft

Author Claire Tomalin recently unveiled another blue plaque to honor the Godwin-Shelley circle, this time Mary Wollstonecraft, who lived at number 45 Dolben Street in London in 1788.

See a brief story and a series of pictures on the London SE1 community Website:

http://www.london-se1.co.uk/news/view.php?ArtID=1084

You can compare here another post on this blog about a recent blue-plaque ceremony to honor her daughter.

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Blake Archive: Visions of the Daughters of Albion

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of electronic editions of Visions of the Daughters of Albion, copy A (British Museum) and proof copy a (Library of Congress). Like all the illuminated books in the Archive, both the texts and images of these new publications are fully searchable and are supported by our Inote and ImageSizer applications.

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Wordsworth's birthplace reopens

The house in the Lake District where William Wordsworth grew up reopened to the public last week after an eight-month £1m renovation. "We want visitors to be inspired to go away and find out more about Wordsworth and his poetry," said Kate Hilton, curator of Wordsworth House, Cockermouth, where the poet was born in 1770. "And perhaps to find out more about life in 18th-century Cumbria."

The people of Cockermouth bought the grand Georgian house, the finest in the town, when it was about to be demolished to make way for a bus station, and gave it to the National Trust in 1938.

Keats @ London

For June, Keats House Museum, Hampstead, is mounting a program of events about the poet's situation in and around London--and not only at the house in Hampstead.

(No, this is not a scene from a Japanese SF movie.)

Here is the schedule of events for the next few weeks:

Wednesday 9 June  at 7.00 pm
Visit the City of London where John Keats was born and grew up. Jean Haynes, a Blue Badge Guide, will lead a walk from the banks of the River Thames to Moorgate. We will visit the site of John Keats birth, the family church and the place where his father died. Meet outside Blackfriars Tube Station at 7.00pm.
Places are limited so please book at Keats House. Tickets priced £5.50 adults,  £4.50 concessions.
Wednesday 16 June  at 7.00pm

Call for Proposals: Romantic Pedagogies

"Wordsworthian Pedagogies" at Romantic Circles

Proposals are invited for an online collection of essays on "Wordsworthian Pedagogies," to be edited by Brad Sullivan. Romantic Circles is launching a new peer-reviewed series, called The Pedagogy Commons, which is designed to explore and highlight emerging teaching theories and practices in Romanticism.

This issue of the Commons will focus on "Wordsworthian" teaching and learning. How do we teach Wordsworth now? How does our pedagogy reflect or dispute critical understandings of Wordsworth and his views of poetry, creativity, and learning? How do we employ Wordsworthian ideas about the mind, experiential learning, and personal engagement in our teaching? What can we (as teachers and students) learn from Wordsworth?

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Day Conference: Romantic-era Writing for Children

The University of London Insitute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, is hosting a one-day conference on Saturday 29 May, 2004, on "Romantic-Era Writing for Children." the conference is co-organised by Chawton House Library, the University of Southampton and the Corvey-Hallam Project. It's schedule and information on attendance can be found here. Or email ies@sas.ac.uk to register.

Keats House given Full Registered Museum status

Keats House given Full Registered Museum status

It was recently announced that the The Keats House in Hampstead has achieved full Registered Museum Status from The Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA--but not to be confused with the Modern Language Association in the US).

The Registration Scheme for Museums and Galleries in the United Kingdom was introduced in 1988, and a second phase was launched in 1995. It measures museum performance against accepted professional standards and, according to the Scheme, has the following aims:

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