September 2003

William Richey: 1956-2003

I'm sorry to report that William Richey passed away on September 7 at age 47 from cancer. He taught in the English Department of University of South Carolina, where he served as Graduate Chair, 1997-2002 and won awards for his teaching. Bill received his BA from UC Berkeley, and his PhD from UCLA. He is the author of Blake's Altering Aesthetic and numerous articles. He also co-edited Lyrical Ballads and Related Writings with Dan Robinson and Reading Rock and Roll with Kevin Dettmar.

Report from Grasmere (Marilyn Gaull)

This note came today from Marilyn Gaull, who is just back from the Lake District and has already been planning for next year’s Wordsworth Summer Conference at Dove Cottage.

What are you working on? (Kevin Binfield)

From time to time we intend to use this blog to ask a scholar in our community, “What's on your desk right now? What are you working on?,” and then post the response. (We got the idea from The Believer magazine.) This seems a good way for all of us to keep up with new or forthcoming projects and to be inspired by their example. So we started by asking the question of Kevin Binfield of Murray State University.

Main Blog Categories: 

Woodring to deliver Marchand Lecture

Our server in Maryland was down for a while this week thanks to Hurricane Isabel. Charlie Robinson e-mailed yesterday from Delaware: "as I look out at the woods in the back yard. I see some swaying trees up 120 feet. So far winds here are merely 30 miles an hour--and I think we will get only the fringes of the storm." He was writing to ask me to post the following announcement:

Carl Woodring, Woodberry Professor Emeritus at Columbia University, noted scholar and author and editor of numerous works, including Politics in English Romantic Poetry and Coleridge’s Table Talk for the Collected Coleridge, will deliver the Fourth Annual Leslie A. Marchand Memorial Lecture on Friday, October 3, 2003, at 4:00pm, at The University of Delaware, 127 Memorial Hall, Newark, DE:

Pforzheimer Grants

Doucet Fischer works in a wonderful place: the wood-paneled book-lined offices of the Pforzheimer Collection of the New York Public Library. Here’s a reminder from her about a funding opportunity specifically for advanced graduate students, junior faculty members, and independent scholars.

digital romanticism

One of the interesting things for me about the field of "Romanticism” right now is the way it’s being redefined around the edges, as it were, when it comes not to the canon but to its own material modes of production—not so much what we read and study as how we get our scholarship done. A case in point is our good friend, Matt Kirschenbaum, who is not a Romanticist per se but is an English professor specializing in digital studies.

Recent Conference: Queer Romanticism

Amanda Berry, of Rhode Island School of Design, sends this participant’s report on a recent conference in Dublin:

Last month, August 15 -16, 2003, I was privileged to attend a two-day international conference on Queer Romanticism that took place at the Women's Education, Research and Resources Center at University College in Dublin. The event was splendidly organized by Michael O'Rourke (U.C. Dublin) and David Collings (Bowdoin College). Many thanks to Michael and David! Papers were presented continuously on both days, [cont'd]

beginning with a talk by George Haggerty (U.C. Riverside) on transgressive social-sexual relations in the trope of gothic terror and closing with Eric Clarke's (U. Pittsburgh) paper on homoeroticism, "lifestyle," and Kant's ethics, which began with a close reading of Kant's uncharacteristic request, during the last days of his life, for a kiss from his friend, Pastor Wasianski.

Peter Manning to Edit the Keats-Shelley Journal

A little over ten years ago I took over from Stuart Curran as Editor of the Keats-Shelley Journal. This meant a lot to me, since I had published my first scholarly article in the KSJ while still a graduate student. It has been educational and fun, a major honor. Now it’s time to give someone else a turn.

The Journal and its readers are extremely lucky that the distinguished scholar and professor of English at the State University of New York, Stonybrook, Peter Manning, has agreed to take over from me as the new Editor, beginning in 2004. Stuart and I had a meeting at the first NASSR conference to discuss our transition. Last month, Peter and I talked at this year’s NASSR in New York (while standing in line for the performance of Death’s Jest Book and then waiting in the seats for the performance to begin), where we made plans for the new transition.