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NASSR/Romantic Circles 2nd Annual Pedagogy Contest: Deadline April 2nd

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Just a brief reminder and encouragement to submit materials to this year's NASSR/Romantic Circles Pedagogy Contest.

The contest was started at last year's NASSR Conference as a way of encouraging and highlighting the many teaching innovations occurring in our field. The finalists' panel at the conference yielded a rich and helpful conversation about Romantic pedagogy.

Teachers of all ranks may submit teaching materials. Exemplary submissions consider how teaching revivifies Romanticism, in any of its myriad forms. Digital innovations are encouraged but certainly not required. For a list of previous winners and their syllabi, see the Pedagogy section of the Romantic Circles website: http://www.rc.umd.edu/pedagogies/contest#previous.

Finalists will be chosen via author-blind peer review to give a short presentation at a special panel at this year's conference in Washington DC, and their syllabi will be published on the Romantic Circles Pedagogies website. The winner, chosen after the panel, will receive a $250 award and recognition at the NASSR banquet. For more information on the contest see the NASSR 2014 website: https://blogs.commons.georgetown.edu/nassr2014/pedagogy-contest/.

TO SUMBIT:
Please send a document of between 3-5 pages to nassrpedagogycontest@gmail.com by April 2, 2014. Please include a cover letter with identifying information, which should be left off all other documents. Initial queries and questions are welcomed.

Potential materials might include but are not limited to:
- A cover letter and explanation of the submission, including an argument as to the course or project’s pedagogical innovation and benefits
- Syllabus or parts of a syllabus
- Assignment sheets
- Multimedia or digital materials

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CFP: Reassessing British Women Writers of the Romantic Period: A Special Issue of Women’s Writing

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Editors: Angela Rehbein and Andrew Winckles

It has been twenty years since the publication of Anne K. Mellor’s foundational study Romanticism and Gender (1993). Those twenty years have witnessed a wellspring of scholarship about Romantic-era women writers and a series of excellent critical biographies and anthologies. Nevertheless, much work remains to be done, both in terms of recovering forgotten women writers of the period and in more clearly contextualizing writers who have already been “recovered.” This special issue invites articles that provide new insight into the lives, writings, and cultural contexts of Romantic-era women. We seek to reconsider how we frame women’s lives and writings: what elements of their experiences do we privilege, and what do we ignore? Perhaps more important, what criteria do we employ when we make these determinations? Topics may include (but are not limited to): women and political writing, gender and genre, women and religion, gender and authorial identity, epistolary culture, literary mentorship, re-thinking periodization (Romantic v. Victorian), and re-assessing the canon.

Please submit articles of 4,000-7,000 words to Angela Rehbein or Andrew Winckles at:

Angela [dot] Rehbein [at] westliberty [dot] edu
awinckle [at] sienaheights [dot] edu (preferred)

OR

West Liberty University
208 University Drive
CU Box 130
West Liberty, WV 26074-0295

Submissions should be sent by January 15, 2014. Details of the journal’s house style can be found on the Women’s Writing web site.

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CFP: NASSR 2014 - Romantic Connections

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We invite proposals for an international Romanticism conference, to be
held at the University of Tokyo on June 13–15, 2014. This event will
bring together four scholarly societies from three continents: it is a
supernumerary conference of the North American Society for the Study
of Romanticism (NASSR), also supported by the British Association for
Romantic Studies (BARS), the German Society for English Romanticism
(GER), and the Japan Association of English Romanticism (JAER).

Over the last two decades, there has been sustained scholarly interest
in the connections between European Romanticism and the peoples,
cultures, and literatures of the rest of the world. While our approach
will be informed by the legacy of Saidian “Orientalism,” we are
particularly interested in models of intercultural connection which
refine or challenge totalizing models of domination and subordination.
We welcome papers that shed light upon the question of “connection”
from the broadest range of perspectives: imaginative, linguistic,
material, social, sexual, scientific, economic, and political.

Drawing on our location in Tokyo, we will use this conference to
consider the broader task of forging connections between Eastern and
Western literature and scholarship. In a Japanese context, the idea of
interpersonal “connection” (kizuna) takes on a different resonance,
because of its close connection to the project of recovery (saisei)
following the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami. This
conference wishes to explore how such acts of cross-cultural
translation offer the possibility of reciprocal transformations of
meaning.

We welcome explorations of the reception of European Romanticism in
Asia and other regions of the world, as well as discussions of the
future status of Romanticism studies in a geographically diverse and
technologically connected scholarly world.

Proposals for papers (200–300 words) are due by November 30, 2013.

For more information, see the conference's website

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CFP: International Byron Conference 2013

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Byron ConferenceBYRON: the poetry of politics and the politics of poetry
The 39th International Byron Conference

1-6 July 2013, King’s College London, Strand Campus

Call for papers

This conference will examine Byron’s engagement with politics in the widest sense: as a poet, as a member of the House of Lords, as a commentator on his time, and latterly as a would-be revolutionary.

Academic sessions might include:
Byron and the politics of culture
Political style in Byron’s writing
Byron and the politics of the ‘Other’
Byron and the politics of emergent nations (Italy, Greece, the Americas)
Byron and the House of Lords
Byron and Napoleon
Byron as social satirist
Byron and revolution
Byron as liberal and/or libertine
Byron and religion
Byron and social class
Byron and gender/sexual politics
Byron and British political parties
Byron and imperialism
Byron and celebrity
Byron’s posthumous political influence
The ‘Byron legend’ (construction and/or appropriation)
‘Words and things’ (literature versus action in Byron’s life and work)

Proposals for papers on these and other aspects of Byron and politics, or the politics of Byron’s poetry, are welcome. Please send 250-word proposals by 28 February 2013 to byron.conference@kcl.ac.uk.

Individual presentations must not exceed 20 minutes in length. In order to accommodate the maximum number of presentations in the programme, the organisers hope to include one or more ‘round-table’ discussions around specific themes. Individual contributions to these discussions would typically be of 5-10 minutes. If you would be willing for your proposal to be included in a ‘round-table’ session, please indicate this when you send it. Ready-formed proposals for such sessions, based on a particular theme, timed to last either 90 or 120 minutes, and including a minimum of 4 speakers, will be particularly welcome.

Please note that you should normally be a current member of a national Byron Society in order to present a paper at the conference. For a list of Byron societies worldwide see www.internationalbyronsociety.org

Bursaries for student presenters

Limited funds are available to help selected students meet the cost of presenting a paper at the conference (either as individual speakers or as Round Table participants). If you wish to be considered for one of these, please indicate this clearly in your proposal. Applicants will be contacted in late March and can expect to know the decision of the Academic Committee by mid-April 2013.

Academic committee

Roderick Beaton (King’s College London)
Bernard Beatty (University of Liverpool)
Peter Graham (Virginia Tech)
Christine Kenyon Jones (King’s College London)
Alan Rawes (University of Manchester)
Jane Stabler (University of St Andrews)

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CFP: Special Issue of Women's Writing on Felicia Hemans

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Katherine Singer, former site manager at Romantic Circles, and Nanora Sweet, a former electronic edition editor, have just issued a call for submissions to a special issue of Women's Writing entitled, Beyond Domesticity: Heman's in the Wider World.

Here's more:

Beyond Domesticity: Hemans in the Wider World
A Special Issue of Women’s Writing

Felicia Hemans (1793-1835) was the sole British woman poet to rank alongside male Romantics in publishing and sales before and after her death. She positioned herself as a cosmopolitan writer in major forms on post-Napoleonic topics, later becoming a pioneer in Biedermeier poetics (of privatized, domestic sentiment). This later development has dominated her recovery in contemporary Romanticism, enabling a reconstruction of “domesticity” itself as a discourse. However, domesticity may be as much an artifact of her life and career as a framework for it. In contrast, this special issue of Women’s Writing seeks essays on the alien, the uncanny, and the foreign in Hemans; the readerly, thinkerly, and artistic; the public, topical, and businesslike; the critical and prophetic.

How did Hemans think through the ramifications of the transatlantic and global worlds, in Europe, Canada, the Americas, the Middle East, and beyond? How did she capitalize on settings peripheral to London (Liverpool, Wales, Edinburgh, Dublin) and how develop networks around and beyond them? How did she rethink or refigure history, mediated by her interests in the medieval and the modern, empire and republic, science, travel, and more? Hemans was a skilled and savvy navigator of the literary marketplace, and what more can we understand about her intervention in and reshaping of publication culture, including periodicals and reviews, publishers and editing then and now? How does she establish dialogue with the myriad, uncanny “voices” in her texts, as paratexts and intertexts? Moreover, how does she experiment with poetics, genre, and medium through her play with a slew of forms? Finally, how does Hemans broach the philosophical through her meditations on ethics, protest, and gender? How does she theorize her relationships to male and female poetic influences, associates, and competitors?

Other topics may include but are not limited to the following areas:
· Contention with established institutions such as church, party, university, royalty
· History as drama; motifs of atrocity, exile, captivity, immolation, the scaffold
· Art, ekphrasis, the musical
· Style, lexicon, classical and Romantic poetics, traditional and innovative forms
· Transcendence, the afterlife, skepticism, consciousness, and prophecy

Please submit articles for consideration between 4000-7000 words to Katherine Singer, Assistant Professor of English, Mt. Holyoke College, ksinger [at] mtholyoke [dot] edu or Nanora Sweet, Associate Professor of English Emeritus, University of Missouri-St. Louis, sweet [at] umsl [dot] edu, by 22 April 2013. Initial queries about articles welcomed.

See instructions for authors and attached style sheet on the Women’s Writing website, http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=rwow20&pa.... Instead of footnotes, we use endnotes with NO bibliography. All bibliographical information is included in the endnotes. For example, place of publication, publisher and date of publication appear in brackets after a book is cited for the first time. Please include an abstract, a brief biographical blurb (approximately 100 words), and six keywords suitable for indexing and abstracting services.

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Spaces of Work and Knowledge in The Long Eighteenth Century

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Abstracts are invited for proposed submissions for publication in a forthcoming collection of essays based on the proceedings of the Spaces of Work 1770-1830 conference held at the University of Warwick April 2012. The publication will follow the broad themes of the conference, but is expanded to include articles focusing on any time within the Long Eighteenth Century, and beyond being focused on Britain to include all geographical locations. Further, the overall headings of ‘space’ and ‘work’ are to be examined in relation to forms of knowledge, broadly conceived.

We are particularly interested in interrogating under-analyzed types of work and space. For example, we hope to develop the theorization of types of work that critics have not conventionally understood as ‘work’ (the performance of music as practical activity, for instance). We also aim to bring attention to under-analysed spaces. For example, due to Romanticism’s traditionally rural focus, literary critics of this period have only recently begun to interrogate urban spaces; interdisciplinary discussion of urbanism in this period would therefore be particularly valuable.

In terms of knowledge, we are particularly interested in forms of knowledge often essentialized and therefore not understood as knowledge as such. The traditionally male knowledge of utilising a commanding voice and demeanour to assert a seemingly innate authority, for example; or the traditionally female knowledge of being able to correctly ascertain the freshness of produce. We aim to elucidate the complex nuances of the interfacing of work, space, and knowledge as three factors that fundamentally shape everyday life in order to gain a greater understanding of material life in the period.

Possible questions which articles might tackle could include:
• How do workers and their work uniquely shape space?
• How does space facilitate or hinder workers and their work?
• How is knowledge acquired, employed, or altered by types of work and working locations?
• How do the social relationships between workers and their supervisors/masters alter according to the work they are doing and the spaces in which they perform it? How does the knowledge encoded in levels of expertise affect the dynamic between supervisors and workers?
• How is knowledge encoded in gender, race, and/or class across working space?

Possible approaches could include, but are not limited to: genteel work and the city; the work of acquiring the necessary knowledge for genteel status; work in spaces of ‘leisure’ and the forms of knowledge encoded therein; work, knowledge, and (sub)urban domestic spaces; gendered working knowledge in the home; space and female accomplishment and the forms of knowledge encoded; working knowledge in relation to emergent manufacturing/industrial spaces.

Pickering & Chatto have expressed an interest in publishing the collection. The exact word length may change, but we expect articles will be approximately 8000 words in length.

Abstracts for proposed articles should be 500 words in length, and be submitted no later than 15 September 2012. Please send abstracts to spacesofwork [at] gmail [dot] com

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CFP: Romantic Voyagers - Voyaging Romantics

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Wellington, New Zealand, 29-30 September 2012

Announcing a two-day International Conference, hosted by the School of English, Film, Theatre, and Media Studies,  Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, and the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.

Click here for the complete flyer.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on all aspects of Romantic voyaging, the period, its context and  its authors. Papers which address the larger issues of ‘voyaging’ will be welcome too. The conference will  include an opportunity to admire some of the treasures of the Rare Book collection of the Alexander Turnbull Library. There will also be time to explore the bracing sea-front and beautiful streets of Wellington with its  numerous restaurants and bars, and to ascend via the famous cable car to the Botanical Gardens.

The keynote speakers are:

Dr Ruth Lightbourne (Alexander Turnbull Library)
Professor Vincent O’Sullivan, DCNZM
Professor Nicholas Roe (St Andrews University, Scotland)

250 word proposals for papers of no more than 2750 words  together with a brief c.v. should occupy no more than 2 sides of  A4 in a Word document (they will be copied into a composite file).  Please do not send as a pdf. E-mail to the Conference Organizer Heidi Thomson heidi (dot) thomson (at) vuw.ac.nz by 1 April 2012. All other enquiries should also be e-mailed to this address.

The Charles Brown Bursary of NZ $550 will be available to enable one unfunded postgraduate scholar working in the field of Romantic Literature (currently enrolled at either MA or PhD level) to travel to and deliver a paper at this conference. Please bring this announcement to the attention of qualified applicants.

Registration and website details are to follow.

Delegates need to arrange their own accommodation. There are a large number of Hotels and B&Bs in Wellington. Hotels within walking distance of the conference venue include: Novotel, Rydges, Intercontinental, Ibis, Bolton, Kingsgate Hotel

The following website is useful for arranging accommodation: http://www.wellingtonnz.com/accommodation

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Call for papers: Money/Myths

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32nd Annual Conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association

March 3-6, 2011 at Arizona State University, Tempe & Phoenix, Arizona

How was money understood in the nineteenth century? in its global context? by laborers? How did the ideation of money evolve around and through art, music, race, nation, and empire? How did the stories told about money influence people and practices? What role do myths play in comprehending money? How were relations between people mediated by narratives of money? relations between nations? This theme would invite papers and panel proposals concerning any aspect of money/myth during the long nineteenth century, including, but not limited to the “myths” or “realities” of trade, debt, industry and investment, economics, money-lending, poverty, consumer culture, class relations, race relations and their economic implications, gender politics, masculinity and femininity as shaped by/of money, sexual politics, sexuality and the law, aesthetics, art and art collecting, theater and performance politics, religion and wealth, social service programs, education, travel, entertainment, sporting, financing and producing wealth through science, international connections and compacts, public/private divide, differential health care, class mobility, marriage, widowhood, inheritance, prostitution, child rearing, infanticide, property politics, movements motivated by money (Chartism, socialism, communism, trades unions, reform), immigration, empire, war, and slavery. Equally welcome are paper and panel proposals concerning the processes of creating mythic structures around money including governmental campaigns, the publishing industry, legal processes, military campaigns, advertising, propaganda, and novelizations.

Abstracts (250 words) for 20 minute papers, author’s name and paper title in heading, with one page c.v. by September 15, 2010: Marlene Tromp, Program Chair, Denison University: nsca [at] denison [dot] edu

Presenters will be notified by December 15, 2010.

Graduate students whose proposals are accepted can at that point submit a full-length version of the paper to compete for a travel grant to help cover transportation and lodging expenses. Registration and accommodation information available November 15, 2010 at http://www.english.uwosh.edu/roth/ncsa/index.html

Keynote Speaker:

Mary Poovey, Samuel Rudin University Professor of the Humanities, Institute for the History of the Production of Knowledge and Department of English, New York University. Author of Genres of the Credit Economy (2008), A History of the Modern Fact: Problems of Knowledge in the Sciences of Wealth and Society (1998), Making a Social Body: British Cultural Formation, 1830-1864 (1995), Uneven Developments: The Ideological Work of Gender in Mid-Victorian England (1989), and The Proper Lady and the Woman Writer: Ideology as Style in the Works of Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, and Jane Austen (1984), all with University of Chicago Press.

TXNZuRuln)b*

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CFP: No Place Like Home: Localism and Regionalism in British Literature and Culture, 1660-1830

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Recent literary studies have generally assumed that regionalism emerged around the turn of the nineteenth century in response to the consolidation of the modern nation-state, imperial expansion, and industrialization, all of which tended to efface cultural, and to some extent geographical, differences among sub-national communities. Yet during the long eighteenth century, various literary and cultural developments—from newspapers, novels, dictionaries, and poems, to antiquarianism, topography, travel writings, and statistical surveys— reflected, and arguably participated in creating, local and regional forms of community. No Place Like Home will explore the idea that regionalism and localism— or, more generally, the aesthetic expressions of sub-national cultural, political, or geographic identities —may have preceded, or at least accompanied, the rise of the nation-state. Our proposed collection aims to challenge “rise of the nation” narratives by exploring forms of regional and local affiliation in British literature and culture in the 150 years preceding the nation-state’s emergence as the paradigmatic form of community in Western Europe. We are therefore soliciting contributions that investigate any of the following topics as they relate to British literature and culture between 1660 and 1830:

-- the emergence of regionalism as an aesthetic, cultural, and/ or political category
-- the development of the concept of the local (especially in contradistinction to the competing claims of the national and the global or cosmopolitan)
-- the evolution of discourses of "rootedness," "aboriginality" or other forms of sub-national belonging, identification, or community

Please send 500-word abstracts for essays of 5,000 to 7,000 words, along with brief academic CVs, to Evan Gottlieb (evan.gottlieb[at]oregonstate.edu) and Juliet Shields (js37[at]u.washington.edu) by September 1, 2009 .

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CFP: Four Dimensions: Spatio-Temporal Shifts Reflected in Nineteenth-Century Literature

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Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
(conference 4/2010; abstract due 9/30/09)
contact email:
lfash[at]brandeis.edu

Four Dimensions: Spatio-Temporal Shifts Reflected in Nineteenth-Century Literature (panel name)

Indisputably, the categories of space and time shift massively in the nineteenth-century; technology speeds experience just as urban growth and land acquisition distort space. In 1750 it took 3 days to travel from Manchester to London; by 1850, it took 6 hours. In 1866 one could even send a message almost instantly from Ireland to Canada across Cyrus Field’s transatlantic cable. The quickening of experiential time was also tied to the spatial developments which required travel technology and created new proximities: between 1810 and 1860, while the country acquired huge tracks of western land, the urban population in the United States increased from 6% to 20%, and by 1861 London, the largest city in the world, reached almost 3 million people. This panel will consider these spatial and temporal developments and their effect on nineteenth-century English language literature on both sides of the Atlantic. How are changing experiences of time and space represented in literary descriptions or emplotment? How do spatio-temporal concerns relate to literary markets and publishing trends such as serialization—that stretching of a story across time in a certain allotted space? Can we graft these notions of changing space and time onto actual events represented in literature? Those who fought or witnessed the Civil War knew they were experiencing a historical moment, one out of time, as they were within it. How do these spatio-temporal concerns relate to imperialism? How do they play out for immigrants, displaced persons, or colonized subjects? Papers focusing on any result of the manner in which time and space experientially alter within the nineteenth-century are welcome. Please send 300 – 500 word abstracts, brief biographical statements, and contact information (postal address, email address, and phone number) for 15 – 20 minute presentations to Lydia Fash (lfash[at]brandeis.edu). Deadline is September 30, 2009.

About the Conference

41st Anniversary Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
April 7-11, 2010
Montreal, Quebec - Hilton Bonaventure

The 41st Annual Convention will feature approximately 350 sessions, as well as dynamic speakers and cultural events. Details and the complete Call for Papers for the 2010 Convention will be posted in June: www.nemla.org.

Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however panelists can only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable. Please note that A/V use comes with a $10 fee.

Travel to Canada now requires a passport for U.S. citizens. Please get your passport application in early.

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