Posts in category "Pedagogies"

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Welcome to the Romantic Circles Pedagogies Reading Group

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Romantic Circles Pedagogies is looking to assemble a porous group of scholars at all levels who want to discuss canonical and emerging texts -- an open, generous, and collegial community of readers and teachers.

Each term, RC Pedagogies will host a virtual reading group on a predetermined text at a set date/time via video-chat on Zoom, an online video-conferencing system (free and easy to use). We envision these events as broadly pedagogical moments for graduate students and established scholars alike who want to increase their own knowledge of the field and/or discover new ways to teach the work. The conversation will welcome those who are reading the text for the first time as well as those who have published extensively on it.

Participants will have the chance to discuss the reading with one another, offer interpretations, and ask questions of the group for about an hour. Each reading group meeting will be kicked-off and mediated by a moderator.

Meetings will be lively, light, open, inclusive, friendly, and hopefully enjoyable occasions for scholars at all stages to think about and converse on the selected text. They will not feature a prepared lecture by the moderator or any invited guest speaker. Our goal is to encourage debate and inquiry among all participants.

RSVP and Mark Your Calendar:

Our first meeting will take place on January 25 at 4pm ET (1pm PT). We will discuss “The Bride of the Greek Isle” (Felicia Hemans). RSVP here by January 15 to save your place for the Winter group meeting. (Space is limited to 25 people.) We will send technical instructions to those who register for the meeting.

Click here to RSVP

Texts and some dates for 2018 are listed below. We welcome suggestions for future readings.

Winter 2018:

Spring 2018:

Summer 2018:

  • Thursday, July 19th; Time TBD

  • Mary Wollstonecraft, Maria; Or, The Wrongs of Woman

Fall 2018:

  • Thursday, October 18th; Time TBD

  • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship

 

We hope you will join us!

 

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New at RC Pedagogies Commons: Translation Theory / Pedagogical Practice

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Romantic Circles is pleased to announce a new special issue of Romantic Circles Pedagogies Commons, "Translation Theory Pedagogical Practice: Teaching Romantic Translation(s)," edited and introduced by C.C. Wharram, with essays by Aishah Alshatti, Daniel DeWispelare, Gillian Dow,Lesa Scholl, Valerie Henitiuk, and C.C. Wharram:

In recent years, we have witnessed the rapid migration of the field of translation studies from a position as “a backwater of the university” in the 1990s—to cite Lawrence Venuti’s oft-quoted complaint—to being a central object of scholarly inquiry in literary and cultural studies and beyond. Even as numerous conferences, symposia, and institutes are organized around the topic of translation, course readings in English literature have not yet come to reflect the same transformative impulse. In diverse ways, the scholars collected in this volume make compelling cases for expanding the repertoire of texts worthy of study in English classrooms to include translations, addressing texts by a wide range of authors and translators including Lord Byron, J. W. von Goethe, S.T. Coleridge, P.C. de Laclos, George Eliot, Sei Shônagon, and Germaine de Staël.

You can find the volume here.

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Call for Contributors to the new Pedagogies Commons

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In an effort to make the Romantic Circles Pedagogies section a true commons, we are looking for a crew of commentators with varying levels of experience for our new blog and pedagogies group.  We hope to launch the blog with several regular contributors of various interests and experience, creating a space for sharing ideas on teaching, texts, and techniques.  We may be able to offer the participants a small stipend for their efforts.  These bloggers will offer one or two posts per week, offering dispatches from the front that reflect on their own Romantic pedagogy and the pedagogy of Romanticism.

Essentially the blog will be the first set in a series of proposed changes to the Pedagogies section of the Romantic Circles website.  We will continue to produce peer-edited volumes of essays, and we hope soon to feature interactive digital projects, interviews, notes on using digital tools such as Wikis and databases, along with the arsenal of syllabi and other teaching materials the site already has to offer (http://www.rc.umd.edu/pedagogies/).  We are imagining this site as a place where professors and students of all levels can debate approaches to particular texts, explore innovative classroom techniques, and report on new Romantic topics.

Interested techno-Romanticists should send a short paragraph of interest to Kate Singer at ksinger[at]mtholyoke[dot]edu, by Sept 3rd.  Please feel free to send any questions as well.

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Romantic Pedagogy Commons: Innovations

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The first issue of the new peer-reviewed venue, Romantic Pedagogy Commons, called "Innovations," is now available at Romantic Circles. It offers numerous tools for teaching, some that are technologically innovative, others that make use of more traditional classroom practices but transfer them to the web (online slide shows, for instance). These tools are primarily for enhancing Romanticism classes, but some of them apply to any literature courses. Mark Phillipson presents the Wiki as an anti-authoritarian class tool: it de-centers classroom authority and participants produce an on line text book, as it were, authored collectively by the class members. Jerome McGann and Johanna Drucker describe IVANHOE, a new program (still in beta testing) that stimulates creative reading practices and interpretive activity among students in a literature course.

The inaugural issue of the Romantic Pedagogy Commons might be of wider interest, however, since it discusses new pedagogical theories and their relation to web tools (the introduction), and defines and explains "Visual Literacy" (three essays by Seiffert, Simmons, and Bjork).

Laura Mandell

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Call for Proposals: Romantic Pedagogies

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"Wordsworthian Pedagogies" at Romantic Circles

Proposals are invited for an online collection of essays on "Wordsworthian Pedagogies," to be edited by Brad Sullivan. Romantic Circles is launching a new peer-reviewed series, called The Pedagogy Commons, which is designed to explore and highlight emerging teaching theories and practices in Romanticism.

This issue of the Commons will focus on "Wordsworthian" teaching and learning. How do we teach Wordsworth now? How does our pedagogy reflect or dispute critical understandings of Wordsworth and his views of poetry, creativity, and learning? How do we employ Wordsworthian ideas about the mind, experiential learning, and personal engagement in our teaching? What can we (as teachers and students) learn from Wordsworth?

This collection of essays is mainly intended for teachers of undergraduate courses on British and European Romantic literature. The editor is seeking submissions that are grounded in research (on Wordsworth, on teaching and learning, in classrooms) and (in true Wordsworthian fashion) well-considered personal experience.

You are invited to submit an essay proposal (250-word abstract) on some aspect of "Wordsworthian Pedagogies." Essays for this volume may vary in length from 3,000 to 10,000 words, and you should indicate the proposed length of your submission. Please submit your proposal to Brad Sullivan, Associate Professor of English, Western New England College [dsulliva@wnec.edu], by June 30, 2004.

The digital format of the Commons can accommodate publications which include resources such as sample syllabi, lesson plans, links to handouts, primary reading texts, or in-class exercises, web pages or samples of web-based student activities, full-color illustrations and designs, sound files, and so on. In your proposal, please include comments about your plans to use these kinds of elements. If you'd like to see examples of what's possible in this medium, you might take a look at the Romantic Circles Praxis volumes. Generally we encourage all essays to include the following elements: (1) a guide to further reading, and (2) links to useful online resources.

All submissions will be peer-reviewed. Romantic Circles editorial staff will adapt the code and design of essays and materials to site standards, so submissions may be in MSWord or HTML. Final essays (and permissions) will need to be submitted to Brad Sullivan as e-mail attachments by September 30, 2004.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS: June 30, 2004. Please submit your proposal to Brad Sullivan . If you have questions about the proposed volume, or wish to discuss possible topics, please contact the editor at the same email address.

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New: Romantic Circles Pedagogies

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Next month, Romantic Circles will launch a special section called Romantic Pedagogies, which will continue to expand well into the summer. Within this section, we plan to set up a "Romantic Commons" in which teaching issues can be discussed and teachers' materials shared with one another.

We plan to establish the section on a firm scholarly footing, including peer-review and MOO conference participation as part of each thematic-based "issue" or site produced. All Romantic Circles materials are peer-reviewed, of course, but we add this by way of indicating that we would work to ensure that people's work "published" and discussed in this site will be adequately valued by their home institutions.

Leaders would serve as editors of thematically named issues within the Pedagogy Commons. For example, we could imagine a special issue called "Wordsworth's Pedagogy," or, say, one on Romantic Ecology. We had originally planned to launch the Commons with the theme "Romantic Women Writers," asking in particular our continental associates how they teach British Romantic women writers. Those interested in helping to establish Romantic Pedagogy Commons as part of the RC Pedagogies section should contact us.

Laura Mandell
Ron Broglio
Tilar Mazzeo

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