Posts in category "Praxis"

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New at RC for the New Year

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New resources this month at Romantic Circles include Shelley Sites/Sights, a pictorial essay of locations associated with Shelley, Fictions of Byron: An Annotated Bibliography, edited by G. Todd Davis, and two new volumes in the Praxis Series, Gothic Technologies, edited by Robert Miles, and Historicizing Romantic Sexuality, edited by Richard Sha. At the Poets on Poets MP3 archive and podcast this week, Robert Thomas reads Keats's "On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer."

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New at RC / CFP: Romantic medicine

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1. See the new at Romantic Circles page for two new volumes in the Praxis series, Romanticism and Opera and Legacies of Paul de Man.
2. Call For Papers: Romantic medicine

Nottingham Trent University and the Midland Romantic Seminar invite 20 minute papers on the subject of Romantic Medicine, for a one-day symposium, to be held in the English Dept. of NTU, on Thurs. 1st December 2005. Plenary speakers will be Neil Vickers (author of Coleridge and the Doctors) Sharon Ruston (author of Shelley and Vitality). Others to be announced. Please contact Tim Fulford < timfulford@tiscali.co.uk >

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New Praxis Volume: Romantic Libraries

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Romantic Circles is pleased to announce the publication of a new volume in its Praxis series, Romantic Libraries, edited by Ina Ferris. It can be found in the Praxis section of Romantic Circles or directly at:

http://www.rc.umd.edu/praxis/libraries/index.html

According to Ferris, the essays in Romantic Libraries "respond to a historical bibliophilia that played into forms of early Romantic masculinity to produce a personal and private inflection of library culture. The volume concentrates on men and their books, exploring the intersection of bookishness, male subjectivity, and literary value.  Essays by Heather Jackson, Deidre Lynch, and Ina Ferris set out to make more visible than has hitherto been the case in Romantic studies the ways in which the physical book--as affective and interiorized object--became central to both personal and cultural identity-formation during the period."

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