Romantic Circles Blog

New Essay by Joseph Viscomi

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Romantic Circles is pleased to announce a newly published essay by Joseph Viscomi, "Wordsworth's Dramatic Antipicturesque: Burke, Gilpin, and 'Lines left upon a Seat in a Yew-tree." In this piece, which is available for reading on the Web or for downloading to your computer in PDF format, Viscomi offers a new reading of "Lines left upon a Seat in a Yew-tree," providing the grounds for thinking of it as a dramatic monologue critiquing Gilpin's idea of the picturesque. This extended essay with two illustrations is the full version of Viscomi's contribution to the special issue of The Wordsworth Circle (38:1-2) dedicated to Karl Kroeber and guest edited by Toby Benis. It can be accessed directly here:

http://www.rc.umd.edu/reference/viscomi_yewtree/viscomi_yewtree.pdf

--or from our Scholarly Resources page.

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New Edition of Poets on Poets

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A new installment of Romantic Circles' Poets on Poets audio series is now available for listening on the Web or to be downloaded as free MP3 podcasts. New readings of Blake, Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith, and L.E.L. by poets Charles Bernstein, R. Erica Doyle, Yunte Huang, Elaine Sexton, and John Struloeff, can be found at

http://www.rc.umd.edu/editions/poets/toc.html

You can also subscribe to Poets on Poets as a podcast via Apple's iTunes (just search for "Romantic Circles Poets on Poets") or by using the RSS feed as explained on our Poets on Poets Website.

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Romantic Circles Poets on Poets on CBS Weekend Roundup

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Two brief clips from Romantic Circles' Poets on Poets series will be included in today's broadcast of the CBS Weekend Roundup radio program, contrasting our recording of "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" by poet Charles North with the rap version performed by the creation of the tourism board, "MC Nuts," a Lake District Red Squirrel.

The May 4, 2007 show can be accessed at the CBS Weekend Roundup podcast page or can be downloaded directly at:

http://audio.cbsnews.com/2007/05/04/audio2763026.mp3

Our segment is in the last story of the day, beginning at about 36:40 into the broadcast.

You can find all of Romantic Circles' audio resources here: http://www.rc.umd.edu/audio.

--The Romantic Circles Editors

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CFP: "Politics and Propaganda"

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Call for Papers
Politics and Propaganda
29th ANNUAL CONFERENCE
OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY STUDIES ASSOCIATION
Florida International University, Miami, Florida April 3-5, 2008

Keynote Speaker: Sally Mitchell,
Emerita Professor of English and Women's Studies, Temple University,
“Political Women: The First Generation”

We welcome paper and panel proposals concerning any aspect of politics during the long nineteenth century, including, but not limited to political figures, movements (Chartism, socialism, communism, anarchism, trades unions, reform), parties, campaigns, immigration, imperialism, suffrage, gender politics, war, slavery, nationalism, pacifism, uprisings, and revolutions.

Equally welcome are paper and panel proposals concerning propaganda, including but not limited to advertising, periodicals, promotion (including self-promotion), news, campaign materials, songs, slogans, cartoons, souvenirs, paraphernalia, monuments, posters, and public art.

Abstracts (250 words) for 20-minute papers, author’s name and paper title in heading, with one-page c.v. by Oct. 1, 2007 to: Kathleen McCormack, Program Chair, Florida International University, mccormac@fiu.edu

Graduate students whose proposals are accepted can at that point submit a full-length version of the paper in competition for a travel grant to help cover transportation and lodging expenses.

Registration and accommodation information will be available on November 1, 2007:
http://www.english.uwosh.edu/roth/ncsa/index.html

The conference will include a reception and tour at the Wolfsonian Museum-FIU, a leading museum of late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century design, which also contains the country’s largest collection of twentieth-century German, Italian, and American political propaganda, including prints, posters, drawings, books and serial holdings, and objects that document the rise and demise of fascist and other political movements.

We have also arranged a Biscayne Bay Boat Tour with local historian and scholar Dr. Paul George of the Historical Museum of Southern Florida. The tour will trace the development of Miami’s coastline in the nineteenth century, including the influence of the first and second Seminole wars, as we view the Key Biscayne Lighthouse, the Cape Florida Lighthouse, and the Barnacle, the oldest house in Miami-Dade County still in its original location.

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Keats-Shelley Prize offered

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The Keats-Shelley Memorial Association prize 2007 (click to download PDF poster with details of the competition):

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CFP: "Byron and Modernity"

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Submissions are invited for "Byron and Modernity" an international conference, sponsored by the University of British Columbia, to be held in Vancouver at the Coast Plaza Hotel and Suites October 26-28, 2007.

Keynote speakers: Professor Christopher Ricks, Professor Jerome McGann, and Professor Tilottama Rajan

We welcome papers that explore the way Byron and Byronism have been interpreted since the Romantic period, in Byron's reception through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the place of Byronism in fashion, popular, and print culture. But we are especially interested in papers that take Byron's presence in modern culture as an opportunity to address wider questions surrounding modernity and modernism. If "the modern" marks the time when the subject left the safety of the local to experience the world, if modernism celebrates change itself as the driving force of global power, to what extent is Byron, the cosmopolitan wanderer and genius of self-promotion, an exemplary, if not pivotal figure of modernity? The Byron circle might be called the first avant-garde: what part did the figure of Byron play in other modern avant-garde movements or in the development of criticism, theory, and culture that followed them? Byron was a social critic and a fashion icon: his work straddles high and low culture, aristocratic pretension and bourgeois consumerism, the power of the mind and the experience of the body. What can his influence tell us about similar contradictions in modern poetry and literature? What might Byron's presence in popular culture and, by contrast, his relative absence from critical culture tell us about culture generally in the modern world? We are less interested in Byron the man than we are in "Byron" the idea, a specter of art, power, and transgression that haunts modern consciousness.

Proposals of 500 words for 20 minute papers may be sent by email to: byron07@interchange.ubc.ca

Deadline for submissions: March 1, 2007 (Original deadline: January 31, 2007)

Conference website: http://www.english.ubc.ca/PROJECTS/byron_conference

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Special issue of ImageText on Blake

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ImageText, an interdisciplinary comics studies journal, is pleased to announce the publication of their special issue on "William Blake and Visual Culture," now available here.

"William Blake and Visual Culture" is edited by Roger Whitson and Donald Ault. It seeks to challenge divisions existing between comic, visual, and Romantic studies. The issue features essays from Arkady Plotnitsky, Nelson Hilton, Ron Broglio, Donald Ault, Esther Leslie, Matthew Ritchie and Roger Whitson, as well as original art by Joel Priddy and John Coulthart and an interview with Bryan Talbot.

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2 CFPs for MLA 2007

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CALL FOR PAPERS

The Wordsworth-Coleridge Association invites proposals for its sessions at the Modern Language Association Convention in Chicago, Illinois, 27-30 December 2007. SESSION TOPIC: "Romanticism, Reading, and Translation: The Processes of Literacy."

Essays should address the history, theory, representation, and practice of reading and translation, and the normative or transgressive roles of readers, writers, and translators in the British Romantic period. Abstracts by 15 March 2007 to James McKusick: james.mckusick@umontana.edu
The John Clare Society of North America invites proposals for its session at the 2007 MLA Convention. SESSION TOPIC: "John Clare in History."

Papers on John Clare in relation to various histories: natural, literary, political, cultural. Abstracts are due by 15 March 2007 to Scott McEathron: McEath@aol.com

NOTE: All MLA program participants must be members of the Modern Language Association by 1 April 2007. (This MLA membership requirement can be waived for program participants who reside outside North America.) It would be helpful to us (in preparing program copy) if you would provide your full name and academic affiliation. For further information on the MLA Convention, go to: http://www.mla.org/convention

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Romantic Circles Audio: Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi

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On 19 October 2006, Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi, Professor Emerita at Stanford University and author of Shelley's Goddess (1992), presented a lecture at Loyola University in Chicago (to a mostly undergraduate student audience) on the topic of "Keats, Shelley, and the 'Bright Star'."

Romantic Circles Audio is now pleased to make the lecture by Barbara Gelpi available here as a podcast. The lecture is downloadable in two parts by clicking on the speaker icons below.

part one

part two

Or you can subscribe (free of charge) to the lecture as a two-part podcast--and then receive future podcasts from Romantic Circles Audio--manually, by using the RSS button below, or via the iTunes store using the iTunes button.

To manually subscribe, simply follow these steps:

1. Copy the link attached to the RSS button below (Mac users ctrl-click, Windows users right-click).

2. Paste this link into any podcast aggregator--for example, iPodder or Apple's iTunes player (under: Advanced > Subscribe to podcast).

podcast

Note: Romantic Circles also publishes the Poets on Poets Archive as a free weekly podcast.

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