Romantic Circles Blog

CFP: "Byron and Modernity"

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Submissions are invited for "Byron and Modernity" an international conference, sponsored by the University of British Columbia, to be held in Vancouver at the Coast Plaza Hotel and Suites October 26-28, 2007.

Keynote speakers: Professor Christopher Ricks, Professor Jerome McGann, and Professor Tilottama Rajan

We welcome papers that explore the way Byron and Byronism have been interpreted since the Romantic period, in Byron's reception through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the place of Byronism in fashion, popular, and print culture. But we are especially interested in papers that take Byron's presence in modern culture as an opportunity to address wider questions surrounding modernity and modernism. If "the modern" marks the time when the subject left the safety of the local to experience the world, if modernism celebrates change itself as the driving force of global power, to what extent is Byron, the cosmopolitan wanderer and genius of self-promotion, an exemplary, if not pivotal figure of modernity? The Byron circle might be called the first avant-garde: what part did the figure of Byron play in other modern avant-garde movements or in the development of criticism, theory, and culture that followed them? Byron was a social critic and a fashion icon: his work straddles high and low culture, aristocratic pretension and bourgeois consumerism, the power of the mind and the experience of the body. What can his influence tell us about similar contradictions in modern poetry and literature? What might Byron's presence in popular culture and, by contrast, his relative absence from critical culture tell us about culture generally in the modern world? We are less interested in Byron the man than we are in "Byron" the idea, a specter of art, power, and transgression that haunts modern consciousness.

Proposals of 500 words for 20 minute papers may be sent by email to: byron07@interchange.ubc.ca

Deadline for submissions: March 1, 2007 (Original deadline: January 31, 2007)

Conference website: http://www.english.ubc.ca/PROJECTS/byron_conference

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Special issue of ImageText on Blake

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ImageText, an interdisciplinary comics studies journal, is pleased to announce the publication of their special issue on "William Blake and Visual Culture," now available here.

"William Blake and Visual Culture" is edited by Roger Whitson and Donald Ault. It seeks to challenge divisions existing between comic, visual, and Romantic studies. The issue features essays from Arkady Plotnitsky, Nelson Hilton, Ron Broglio, Donald Ault, Esther Leslie, Matthew Ritchie and Roger Whitson, as well as original art by Joel Priddy and John Coulthart and an interview with Bryan Talbot.

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2 CFPs for MLA 2007

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CALL FOR PAPERS

The Wordsworth-Coleridge Association invites proposals for its sessions at the Modern Language Association Convention in Chicago, Illinois, 27-30 December 2007. SESSION TOPIC: "Romanticism, Reading, and Translation: The Processes of Literacy."

Essays should address the history, theory, representation, and practice of reading and translation, and the normative or transgressive roles of readers, writers, and translators in the British Romantic period. Abstracts by 15 March 2007 to James McKusick: james.mckusick@umontana.edu
The John Clare Society of North America invites proposals for its session at the 2007 MLA Convention. SESSION TOPIC: "John Clare in History."

Papers on John Clare in relation to various histories: natural, literary, political, cultural. Abstracts are due by 15 March 2007 to Scott McEathron: McEath@aol.com

NOTE: All MLA program participants must be members of the Modern Language Association by 1 April 2007. (This MLA membership requirement can be waived for program participants who reside outside North America.) It would be helpful to us (in preparing program copy) if you would provide your full name and academic affiliation. For further information on the MLA Convention, go to: http://www.mla.org/convention

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Romantic Circles Audio: Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi

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On 19 October 2006, Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi, Professor Emerita at Stanford University and author of Shelley's Goddess (1992), presented a lecture at Loyola University in Chicago (to a mostly undergraduate student audience) on the topic of "Keats, Shelley, and the 'Bright Star'."

Romantic Circles Audio is now pleased to make the lecture by Barbara Gelpi available here as a podcast. The lecture is downloadable in two parts by clicking on the speaker icons below.

part one

part two

Or you can subscribe (free of charge) to the lecture as a two-part podcast--and then receive future podcasts from Romantic Circles Audio--manually, by using the RSS button below, or via the iTunes store using the iTunes button.

To manually subscribe, simply follow these steps:

1. Copy the link attached to the RSS button below (Mac users ctrl-click, Windows users right-click).

2. Paste this link into any podcast aggregator--for example, iPodder or Apple's iTunes player (under: Advanced > Subscribe to podcast).

podcast

Note: Romantic Circles also publishes the Poets on Poets Archive as a free weekly podcast.

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Romantic Circles Audio: Catherine Gallagher

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Romantic Circles is very pleased to present here a special audio podcast of the plenary address delivered Thursday evening, 31 August 2006, at the NASSR/NAVSA 2006 conference at Purdue University by Catherine Gallagher of the University of California, Berkeley, "Slave Trade Suppression and Narratives of Undoing in the Atlantic."

Professor Gallagher's talk made use of slides showing characters in Jane Austen's Mansfield Park to accompany an imagined scene of conversation--a scene referred to but not actually found in the novel. Listeners to this podcast version may not always be able to follow who is speaking in the imagined dialogue, as Gallagher does the voices of characters in the novel, Fanny, Sir Thomas, Edmund, Maria, and others. But the contents of the conversation are clear enough, and we believe the act of imagination thereby required (not unlike listening to a radio drama) is very much in keeping with the spirit of Professor Gallagher's discursive experiment.

The entire address (with an introduction by Professor Dino Felluga) is downloadable in two parts by clicking on the speaker icons below.

part one

part two
Or you can subscribe (free of charge) to this plenary address as a two-part podcast--and then receive future podcasts from Romantic Circles Audio--manually, by using the RSS button below, or via the iTunes store using the iTunes button.

To manually subscribe, simply follow these steps:

1. Copy the link attached to the RSS button below (Mac users ctrl-click, Windows users right-click).

2. Paste this link into any podcast aggregator--for example, iPodder or Apple's iTunes player (under: Advanced > Subscribe to podcast).

podcast

Note: Romantic Circles also publishes the Poets on Poets Archive as a free weekly podcast.

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Constable at the National Gallery, Washington

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"Constable's Great Landscapes: the Six-Foot Paintings"
The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C.
October 1-December 31, 2006

John Constable regarded the six foot-long landscapes that he began to paint in 1818–1819 as his most serious and significant achievements. This exhibition will focus on these great paintings and the full-size oil sketches for them. See the Gallery's Website for more information.

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CFP: Race and Ethnicity in the Nineteenth Century

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"Race and Ethnicity in the Nineteenth Century"
28th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth-Century Studies Association (NCSA)
Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, PA, March 8-10, 2007

We invite submission of papers and panel proposals that explore all aspects of race and ethnicity in the 19th century, from all disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives. Topics might connect race and ethnicity with social identity or social control; with land use, ecology, city planning or industrialism; with emigration and immigration patterns; with aesthetics or with the sciences; with gender and sexuality. The organizers encourage the broadest interpretation of the topic, and the widest application to cultural phenomena.

The wealth of racial and ethnic history in Pennsylvania’s Central Susquehanna Valley will provide an excellent focal point for wide ranging discussions. Fergus Bordewich, author of Bound for Canaan: The Underground Railroad and the War for the Soul of America (2005 Amistad), will present the first public lecture; Malcolm Dick, author of Joseph Priestley and Birmingham (Studley 2005), will present the second public lecture on race, religion, and the legacy of Joseph Priestley. Karen James of the PA Historical and Museum Commission will anchor a roundtable discussion on research methods for recovering African American involvement in the Underground Railroad. Local scholars will lead special tours of Underground Railroad sites and 19th-century architecture, including buildings of Joseph Priestley, Thomas Edison, and Eli Slifer.

Submit a one page abstract of a 20 minute paper, with author and title in heading, and one page vita by Nov. 1, 2006. Send materials or inquiries to Drew Hubbell, Conference Organizer: hubbell@susqu.edu. Registration, transportation, and accommodation information available in the Fall:

http://www.msu.edu/~floyd/ncsa/

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Romantic Circles Audio: Thomas Laqueur

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Romantic Circles is very pleased to present here a special audio podcast of the plenary address delivered Saturday evening, 2 September 2006, at the NASSR/NAVSA 2006 conference at Purdue University by Thomas Laqueur of the University of California, Berkeley: "Burning the Dead from Shelley to the Late Victorians."

The entire address is downloadable in two parts (approx. 24 MB each) by clicking on the speaker icons below.

part one

part two
Or you can subscribe (free of charge) to this plenary address as a two-part podcast--and then receive future podcasts from Romantic Circles Audio--manually, by using the RSS button below, or via the iTunes store using the iTunes button.

To manually subscribe, simply follow these steps:

1. Copy the link attached to the RSS button below (Mac users ctrl-click, Windows users right-click).

2. Paste this link into any podcast aggregator--for example, iPodder or Apple's iTunes player (under: Advanced > Subscribe to podcast).

podcast

Romantic Circles also publishes the Poets on Poets Archive as a free weekly podcast.

Main Blog Categories: 

Parent Resource: 

RC Blog

Conference: "Byron and Modernity"

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Submissions are invited for “Byron and Modernity” an international conference, sponsored by the Department of English and Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia, to be held in Vancouver at the Coast Plaza Hotel and Suites October 26-28, 2007.

We welcome papers that explore the way Byron and Byronism have been interpreted since the Romantic period, in Byron’s reception through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the place of Byronism in fashion, popular, and print culture. But we are especially interested in papers that take Byron’s presence in modern culture as an opportunity to address wider questions surrounding modernity and modernism. If “the modern” marks the time when the subject left the safety of the local to experience the world, if modernism celebrates change itself as the driving force of global power, to what extent is Byron, the cosmopolitan wanderer and genius of self-promotion, an exemplary, if not pivotal figure of modernity? The Byron circle might be called the first avant-garde: what part did the figure of Byron play in other modern avant-garde movements or in the development of criticism, theory, and culture that followed them? Byron was a social critic and a fashion icon: his work straddles high and low culture, aristocratic pretension and bourgeois consumerism, the power of the mind and the experience of the body. What can his influence tell us about similar contradictions in modern poetry and literature? What might Byron’s presence in popular culture and, by contrast, his relative absence from critical culture tell us about culture generally in the modern world? We are less interested in Byron the man than we are in “Byron” the idea, a specter of art, power, and transgression that haunts modern consciousness.

Proposals of 500 words for 20 minute papers may be sent by email to:

byron07@interchange.ubc.ca

Deadline for submissions: January 30, 2007

Conference website: http://www.english.ubc.ca/PROJECTS/byron_conference

Main Blog Categories: 

Parent Resource: 

RC Blog

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