Romantic Circles Blog

Romantic Circles Audio: Catherine Gallagher

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Romantic Circles is very pleased to present here a special audio podcast of the plenary address delivered Thursday evening, 31 August 2006, at the NASSR/NAVSA 2006 conference at Purdue University by Catherine Gallagher of the University of California, Berkeley, "Slave Trade Suppression and Narratives of Undoing in the Atlantic."

Professor Gallagher's talk made use of slides showing characters in Jane Austen's Mansfield Park to accompany an imagined scene of conversation--a scene referred to but not actually found in the novel. Listeners to this podcast version may not always be able to follow who is speaking in the imagined dialogue, as Gallagher does the voices of characters in the novel, Fanny, Sir Thomas, Edmund, Maria, and others. But the contents of the conversation are clear enough, and we believe the act of imagination thereby required (not unlike listening to a radio drama) is very much in keeping with the spirit of Professor Gallagher's discursive experiment.

The entire address (with an introduction by Professor Dino Felluga) is downloadable in two parts by clicking on the speaker icons below.

part one

part two
Or you can subscribe (free of charge) to this plenary address as a two-part podcast--and then receive future podcasts from Romantic Circles Audio--manually, by using the RSS button below, or via the iTunes store using the iTunes button.

To manually subscribe, simply follow these steps:

1. Copy the link attached to the RSS button below (Mac users ctrl-click, Windows users right-click).

2. Paste this link into any podcast aggregator--for example, iPodder or Apple's iTunes player (under: Advanced > Subscribe to podcast).

podcast

Note: Romantic Circles also publishes the Poets on Poets Archive as a free weekly podcast.

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Constable at the National Gallery, Washington

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"Constable's Great Landscapes: the Six-Foot Paintings"
The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D. C.
October 1-December 31, 2006

John Constable regarded the six foot-long landscapes that he began to paint in 1818–1819 as his most serious and significant achievements. This exhibition will focus on these great paintings and the full-size oil sketches for them. See the Gallery's Website for more information.

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CFP: Race and Ethnicity in the Nineteenth Century

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"Race and Ethnicity in the Nineteenth Century"
28th Annual Conference of the Nineteenth-Century Studies Association (NCSA)
Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, PA, March 8-10, 2007

We invite submission of papers and panel proposals that explore all aspects of race and ethnicity in the 19th century, from all disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives. Topics might connect race and ethnicity with social identity or social control; with land use, ecology, city planning or industrialism; with emigration and immigration patterns; with aesthetics or with the sciences; with gender and sexuality. The organizers encourage the broadest interpretation of the topic, and the widest application to cultural phenomena.

The wealth of racial and ethnic history in Pennsylvania’s Central Susquehanna Valley will provide an excellent focal point for wide ranging discussions. Fergus Bordewich, author of Bound for Canaan: The Underground Railroad and the War for the Soul of America (2005 Amistad), will present the first public lecture; Malcolm Dick, author of Joseph Priestley and Birmingham (Studley 2005), will present the second public lecture on race, religion, and the legacy of Joseph Priestley. Karen James of the PA Historical and Museum Commission will anchor a roundtable discussion on research methods for recovering African American involvement in the Underground Railroad. Local scholars will lead special tours of Underground Railroad sites and 19th-century architecture, including buildings of Joseph Priestley, Thomas Edison, and Eli Slifer.

Submit a one page abstract of a 20 minute paper, with author and title in heading, and one page vita by Nov. 1, 2006. Send materials or inquiries to Drew Hubbell, Conference Organizer: hubbell@susqu.edu. Registration, transportation, and accommodation information available in the Fall:

http://www.msu.edu/~floyd/ncsa/

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Romantic Circles Audio: Thomas Laqueur

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Romantic Circles is very pleased to present here a special audio podcast of the plenary address delivered Saturday evening, 2 September 2006, at the NASSR/NAVSA 2006 conference at Purdue University by Thomas Laqueur of the University of California, Berkeley: "Burning the Dead from Shelley to the Late Victorians."

The entire address is downloadable in two parts (approx. 24 MB each) by clicking on the speaker icons below.

part one

part two
Or you can subscribe (free of charge) to this plenary address as a two-part podcast--and then receive future podcasts from Romantic Circles Audio--manually, by using the RSS button below, or via the iTunes store using the iTunes button.

To manually subscribe, simply follow these steps:

1. Copy the link attached to the RSS button below (Mac users ctrl-click, Windows users right-click).

2. Paste this link into any podcast aggregator--for example, iPodder or Apple's iTunes player (under: Advanced > Subscribe to podcast).

podcast

Romantic Circles also publishes the Poets on Poets Archive as a free weekly podcast.

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Parent Resource: 

RC Blog

Conference: "Byron and Modernity"

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Submissions are invited for “Byron and Modernity” an international conference, sponsored by the Department of English and Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia, to be held in Vancouver at the Coast Plaza Hotel and Suites October 26-28, 2007.

We welcome papers that explore the way Byron and Byronism have been interpreted since the Romantic period, in Byron’s reception through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the place of Byronism in fashion, popular, and print culture. But we are especially interested in papers that take Byron’s presence in modern culture as an opportunity to address wider questions surrounding modernity and modernism. If “the modern” marks the time when the subject left the safety of the local to experience the world, if modernism celebrates change itself as the driving force of global power, to what extent is Byron, the cosmopolitan wanderer and genius of self-promotion, an exemplary, if not pivotal figure of modernity? The Byron circle might be called the first avant-garde: what part did the figure of Byron play in other modern avant-garde movements or in the development of criticism, theory, and culture that followed them? Byron was a social critic and a fashion icon: his work straddles high and low culture, aristocratic pretension and bourgeois consumerism, the power of the mind and the experience of the body. What can his influence tell us about similar contradictions in modern poetry and literature? What might Byron’s presence in popular culture and, by contrast, his relative absence from critical culture tell us about culture generally in the modern world? We are less interested in Byron the man than we are in “Byron” the idea, a specter of art, power, and transgression that haunts modern consciousness.

Proposals of 500 words for 20 minute papers may be sent by email to:

byron07@interchange.ubc.ca

Deadline for submissions: January 30, 2007

Conference website: http://www.english.ubc.ca/PROJECTS/byron_conference

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CFP: "Anglo-European Romanticism and the origins of psychiatry"

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Special Issue of History of Psychiatry: "Anglo-European Romanticism and the origins of psychiatry"

This special issue, to be published in late 2008, seeks to explore and test the commonplace that the rise of psychiatry is chronologically commensurate with European Romanticism. Towards this goal it inquires whether the claim can hold up and, if so, under what specific conditions. It invites broad, interdisciplinary approaches capable of assessing the psychiatry, or its equivalents, of different historical periods to make the case for, or against, Romanticism and the origins of psychiatry. The Romanticism addressed is focused on the generations from 1770 to 1830, and especially includes its literature and philosophy. Papers on the wide role of such thinkers as Kant are especially welcome, as are those on developments in depression, hysteria and suicide. Self-contained studies of individual thinkers (e.g., Burton, the early English psychiatrists, Pinel, Esquirol, Freud and the Germans) or writers (e.g., Coleridge, Shelley, the German nature philosophers) are not encouraged except insofar as they relate to the larger comparative matter of origins and development.

Authors are invited to contribute papers of not more than 7000 words inclusive of notes and references, and must be formatted in the journal’s house style. Scholars in all disciplines of the humanities and sciences, including medicine and its history, are invited to submit their proposals containing not more than 500 words describing their approach to Professor George Rousseau at george.rousseau@ntlworld.com by 1 February 2007. The deadline for finished contributions is 30 November 2007.

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2007 BARS/NASSR conference

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Emancipation, Liberation, Freedom
26-30 July, 2007, University of Bristol

The Board of the 2007 joint BARS (British Association of Romantic Studies) and NASSR (North American Society for the Study of Romanticism) Conference, to be held at Bristol University 26-29 July 2007, invites papers under the conference theme "Emancipation, Liberation, Freedom." Each of these three terms has significant and overlapping resonances in the Romantic period, reaching across a range of disciplines including philosophy, history, art history, music, aesthetics, political theory, legal theory, and European literature. The online call for papers (deadline 1 December 2006) can be found at:

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/romanticstudies/events/2007callforpapers.html

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Coleridge Family Archive Acquired by British Library

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"The British Library has acquired the archive of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's extended family, a mass of papers and bound volumes dating from the middle of the 18th century to the beginning of the 20th...."

See the full story in Guardian Unlimited.

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Betty T. Bennett

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Dr. Betty T. Bennett, distinguished professor of literature and former dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at American University, Washington, D.C., died at Sibley Hospital on Saturday, August 12, after an heroic five-year battle with lung cancer. She was 71.

A proud native of Brooklyn, New York, Betty graduated from Brooklyn College magna cum laude and later earned her MA and PhD from New York University in English and American literature. She was internationally recognized and frequently published as a major scholar of Romantic literature, doing authoritative work on Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley and on the Shelley Circle. She also served on numerous boards, held leadership positions in many scholarly societies, and directed conferences.

Betty Bennett served as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at American University from 1985 through 1997. In 1997, she was named distinguished professor of literature. She had previously served as dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and acting provost of Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and as assistant to the dean of the graduate school at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Betty Bennett was a hard-hitting and resilient dean and a passionate spokesperson for the arts and sciences who contributed significantly to American University's prestige. As an administrator, scholar, and teacher, she had high standards to which she expected others to aspire. Her legendary poetry "slams" in one of her general education classes gave evidence of her ingenious and highly successful teaching.

Survivors include two sons, Peter Bennett of New York and Matthew Bennett of Los Angeles, and a brother, Marvin Edelman of New York, all of whom were at Betty Bennett's bedside at her death.

A memorial service will be held in Betty Bennett's honor on September 18, 2006, at 11:30 AM, on the campus of American University, at the Kay Spiritual Life Center, in Washington, D.C. Reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society and sent c/o Matthew Bennett, 11693 San Vicente Blvd. #801, Los Angeles, CA 90049.

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b. August 4, 1792

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Here are the search results for "Percy Bysshe Shelley" just at Romantic Circles.

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