Romantic Circles Blog

Conference: "Byron and Modernity"

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Submissions are invited for “Byron and Modernity” an international conference, sponsored by the Department of English and Faculty of Arts at the University of British Columbia, to be held in Vancouver at the Coast Plaza Hotel and Suites October 26-28, 2007.

We welcome papers that explore the way Byron and Byronism have been interpreted since the Romantic period, in Byron’s reception through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the place of Byronism in fashion, popular, and print culture. But we are especially interested in papers that take Byron’s presence in modern culture as an opportunity to address wider questions surrounding modernity and modernism. If “the modern” marks the time when the subject left the safety of the local to experience the world, if modernism celebrates change itself as the driving force of global power, to what extent is Byron, the cosmopolitan wanderer and genius of self-promotion, an exemplary, if not pivotal figure of modernity? The Byron circle might be called the first avant-garde: what part did the figure of Byron play in other modern avant-garde movements or in the development of criticism, theory, and culture that followed them? Byron was a social critic and a fashion icon: his work straddles high and low culture, aristocratic pretension and bourgeois consumerism, the power of the mind and the experience of the body. What can his influence tell us about similar contradictions in modern poetry and literature? What might Byron’s presence in popular culture and, by contrast, his relative absence from critical culture tell us about culture generally in the modern world? We are less interested in Byron the man than we are in “Byron” the idea, a specter of art, power, and transgression that haunts modern consciousness.

Proposals of 500 words for 20 minute papers may be sent by email to:

byron07@interchange.ubc.ca

Deadline for submissions: January 30, 2007

Conference website: http://www.english.ubc.ca/PROJECTS/byron_conference

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CFP: "Anglo-European Romanticism and the origins of psychiatry"

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Special Issue of History of Psychiatry: "Anglo-European Romanticism and the origins of psychiatry"

This special issue, to be published in late 2008, seeks to explore and test the commonplace that the rise of psychiatry is chronologically commensurate with European Romanticism. Towards this goal it inquires whether the claim can hold up and, if so, under what specific conditions. It invites broad, interdisciplinary approaches capable of assessing the psychiatry, or its equivalents, of different historical periods to make the case for, or against, Romanticism and the origins of psychiatry. The Romanticism addressed is focused on the generations from 1770 to 1830, and especially includes its literature and philosophy. Papers on the wide role of such thinkers as Kant are especially welcome, as are those on developments in depression, hysteria and suicide. Self-contained studies of individual thinkers (e.g., Burton, the early English psychiatrists, Pinel, Esquirol, Freud and the Germans) or writers (e.g., Coleridge, Shelley, the German nature philosophers) are not encouraged except insofar as they relate to the larger comparative matter of origins and development.

Authors are invited to contribute papers of not more than 7000 words inclusive of notes and references, and must be formatted in the journal’s house style. Scholars in all disciplines of the humanities and sciences, including medicine and its history, are invited to submit their proposals containing not more than 500 words describing their approach to Professor George Rousseau at george.rousseau@ntlworld.com by 1 February 2007. The deadline for finished contributions is 30 November 2007.

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2007 BARS/NASSR conference

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Emancipation, Liberation, Freedom
26-30 July, 2007, University of Bristol

The Board of the 2007 joint BARS (British Association of Romantic Studies) and NASSR (North American Society for the Study of Romanticism) Conference, to be held at Bristol University 26-29 July 2007, invites papers under the conference theme "Emancipation, Liberation, Freedom." Each of these three terms has significant and overlapping resonances in the Romantic period, reaching across a range of disciplines including philosophy, history, art history, music, aesthetics, political theory, legal theory, and European literature. The online call for papers (deadline 1 December 2006) can be found at:

http://www.bristol.ac.uk/romanticstudies/events/2007callforpapers.html

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Coleridge Family Archive Acquired by British Library

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"The British Library has acquired the archive of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's extended family, a mass of papers and bound volumes dating from the middle of the 18th century to the beginning of the 20th...."

See the full story in Guardian Unlimited.

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Betty T. Bennett

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Dr. Betty T. Bennett, distinguished professor of literature and former dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at American University, Washington, D.C., died at Sibley Hospital on Saturday, August 12, after an heroic five-year battle with lung cancer. She was 71.

A proud native of Brooklyn, New York, Betty graduated from Brooklyn College magna cum laude and later earned her MA and PhD from New York University in English and American literature. She was internationally recognized and frequently published as a major scholar of Romantic literature, doing authoritative work on Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley and on the Shelley Circle. She also served on numerous boards, held leadership positions in many scholarly societies, and directed conferences.

Betty Bennett served as dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at American University from 1985 through 1997. In 1997, she was named distinguished professor of literature. She had previously served as dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and acting provost of Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and as assistant to the dean of the graduate school at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.

Betty Bennett was a hard-hitting and resilient dean and a passionate spokesperson for the arts and sciences who contributed significantly to American University's prestige. As an administrator, scholar, and teacher, she had high standards to which she expected others to aspire. Her legendary poetry "slams" in one of her general education classes gave evidence of her ingenious and highly successful teaching.

Survivors include two sons, Peter Bennett of New York and Matthew Bennett of Los Angeles, and a brother, Marvin Edelman of New York, all of whom were at Betty Bennett's bedside at her death.

A memorial service will be held in Betty Bennett's honor on September 18, 2006, at 11:30 AM, on the campus of American University, at the Kay Spiritual Life Center, in Washington, D.C. Reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society and sent c/o Matthew Bennett, 11693 San Vicente Blvd. #801, Los Angeles, CA 90049.

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b. August 4, 1792

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Here are the search results for "Percy Bysshe Shelley" just at Romantic Circles.

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Lost Shelley pamphlet surfaces

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A copy of Shelley's long-lost "Poetical Essay" ("On the Existing State of Things") in support of radical journalist Peter Finnerty, published 1811, reccently showed up at auction and was purchased by a London bookseller. This story in the TLS provides useful context.

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Poets on Poets: Anne Waldman performs Shelley

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Recently Romantic Circles' Poets on Poets section, edited by Tilar Mazzeo, was lucky to be able to post recordings of Shelley poems performed by poet Anne Waldman. For one, a political ode by Shelley written in 1819 in the aftermath of the Napoleonic wars and European restorations, Waldman reads accompanied by music. For the other, Shelley's "Ode to the West Wind," she alters her voice with interesting echo effects.

(Thanks to Doug Guerra for editing and producing these audio files for Romantic Circles.)

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British Academy Symposium: "Romanticism and Science"

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The British Academy is hosting a one-day symposium on "Romanticism and Science," in association with the British Association for Romantic Studies to be held on 15th September 2006 at the British Academy, 10 Carlton House Terrace, London, SW1. All are welcome.

In the past, Romanticism has been seen as opposed to science, held as promoting the transcendental and otherworldly above the material and physical. This symposium seeks to interrogate this view, exploring a time before the sciences and the arts had been divided into "two cultures." Science pervaded every aspect of Romantic life and literature, as the secondary object of exploration detailed in travel narratives, the emergence of new print technologies, the use of anatomy in religious arguments for evidence of Design in nature, or physiological accounts of the effects of an encounter with the sublime in aesthetic theories. The speakers in this symposium will challenge traditional notions of Romanticism, revealing that even the most canonical Romantic writers were aware of and interested in scientific knowledge and discoveries.

9.30-10am: Registration and Tea/coffee

10-11am: Professor Richard Holmes (FBA, University of East Anglia),
'Scientific discovery and the poets'

11am-12pm: Dr Neil Vickers (King's College, London), 'Carcase Coleridge or
Coleridge and the rhetoric of the eighteenth-century medical case'

12-1pm: Lunch

1-2pm: Dr Sharon Ruston (University of Wales, Bangor), 'Natural Rights and
Natural History'

2-2.30pm: Tea/coffee

2.30-3.30pm: Professor Peter Kitson (University of Dundee), 'The Limits of
the Human: Frankenstein, Anatomy and Racial Science'

3.30-4.30pm: Professor Timothy Fulford (Nottingham Trent University), 'The
Anatomy of Racism: What Natural History Saw in Native People's Skulls'

Organiser: Sharon Ruston, University of Wales, Bangor

To register for this event, please contact:
The Meetings Department
Telephone: 020 7969 5246
Email: events@britac.ac.uk
For further details and to book, please refer to
http://www.britac.ac.uk/events/2006/romanticism/prog.html

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CFP: "The British Periodical Text, 1796-1832"

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Centre for Romantic Studies, University of Bristol

Plenary Speakers: Gregory Dart (University College London), John Strachan
(University of Sunderland), Tim Webb (University of Bristol)

A one-and-a-half-day conference organized by the Department of English, taking place in Bristol on Thursday 28th and Friday 29th September, 2006.

"Is there no stopping the eternal wheels of the Press for half a century or two, till the nation recover its senses? Must we magazine it and review [it] at this sickening rate for ever? Shall we never again read to be amused? but to judge, to criticise, to talk about it and about it": "Lepus" (Charles Lamb), "Readers Against the Grain," The New Times (January, 1825).

We welcome papers discussing any aspect of magazine publication during a period marked by a highly prolific, competitive, and innovative milieu.

Subjects could include: the city, the country, and the periodical; modes and uses of advertising; the general cultural status of the periodical; juxtapositions of worded and visual texts; cartoons and satire; travel writing and foreign correspondence; the commercial and other implications of technological innovation; inter-periodical rivalries and disputes; reporting the war; the periodical and reform; sport and leisure and the periodical; the critical issues surrounding periodical texts later revised for book-publication.

Proposals for 20-minute papers are now invited, from new scholars and established academics alike. These proposals should take the form of a title and 200-word abstract and should be submitted electronically to Simon Hull at: romantic-studies@bristol.ac.uk in the body of an email or as an attachment in .doc format. Please include institutional affiliation and position in the body of the text.

Deadline for submission: 30 June, 2006

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