Romantic Circles Blog

Keats-Shelley Association posts review of recent staged reading of Prometheus Unbound

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The Keats-Shelley Association of America has posted a review of a recent staged reading of Percy Shelley's Prometheus Unbound. The performance took place on November 18 at the Lucille Lortel Theatre in NYC and was hosted by the Red Bull Theater and the Romanticist Research Group of New York University.

Here is an excerpt from the review:

On November 18, 2013 at the Lucille Lortel Theatre in the West Village, Revelation Readings, in conjunction with Red Bull Theater and the Romanticist Research Group of New York University, presented the first staged reading of Percy Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound since 1998. The performance was followed by an informal Q&A with the director, Craig Baldwin, Red Bull artistic director Jesse Berger, Randie Sessler and Omar F. Miranda from the NYU Department of English, and several exhausted cast members who generously remained after the show to discuss the project with the audience. A sold-out crowd of approximately three hundred—apparently comprising both Shelley enthusiasts and theater fans—enjoyed a lively and nuanced performance that was especially impressive given that the cast had only a single rehearsal that same afternoon.

The full text of the review can be found here.

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New Issue of Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy

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The most recent issue of the Journal of Interactive Technology and Pedagogy is now live at http://jitp.commons.gc.cuny.edu. Included in this issue is a project by Roger Whitson documenting his experience using process-oriented publishing to teach the expansion of middle-class reading and printing in the nineteenth century alongside the discourse of digital media today.

From the intro:

What classroom roles do journal editors have in the digital age? Roger Whitson invited JITP editors Amanda Licastro and Kimon Keramidas into his class on “The Nineteenth-Century Novel” to explore how editors can supplement traditional classroom instruction and investigate the purpose of design and digital publishing in literary period courses. The course involved a history of reading and book-design in the nineteenth century, along with assignments that encouraged students to experience reading and writing in different modalities. Over the course of twenty months this project has resulted in a wide variety of content, both formal and informal. To display that process and those materials, the authors have designed this project in the form of the interactive timeline below, which gives the scope of the project as a whole. Included in the timeline are date markers of specific milestones and events that took place during the process but don’t link to any specific product, links to documents and multimedia elements created in the evolution of that process, and links to the final formal articles published in the journal.

The full article is available here: http://jitp.commons.gc.cuny.edu/digital-literary-pedagogy-an-experiment-...

Thanks to Leila Walker for posting this on the NASSR listserv, from which this post is taken.

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The Charles Lamb Bulletin Online

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The back catalogue of the Charles Lamb Bulletin (from our first issue in 1973 to issue 143 in July 2008) is now available online at our website:

http://www.charleslambsociety.com/b-online.html

This is a fantastic new resource available to Elians around the world, allowing free access to a range of distinguished scholarship on the Lambs and their circle.

Issues printed in the last five years, however, have not been made available online to encourage continued subscription to our Society. Please explore our new website devoted to Charles and Mary Lamb.

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New issue of 'RaVoN'

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Issue #61 of 'Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net' is now available on the Érudit server.

Guest-edited by Tim Fulford, it is a special issue entitled ‘Coleridge and his Circle: New Perspectives‘. You can find it at:

http://www.erudit.org/revue/ravon/2012/v/n61/index.html?lang=en

845 articles and reviews have now been published in RaVoN since its first issue appeared in February 1996.

Table of Contents:

- Tim Fulford, ‘Coleridge and his Circle: New Perspectives’

ARTICLES:
- Anya Taylor, ‘Catherine the Great: Coleridge, Byron, and Erotic Politics on the Eastern Front’
- Alan Bewell, ‘Coleridge and Communication’
- Julia S. Carlson, ‘Measuring Distance, Pointing Address: The Textual Geography of the “Poem to Coleridge” and “To W. Wordsworth”‘
- Alan Vardy, ‘Coleridge on Broad Stand’
- Tim Fulford, Coleridge’s Visions of 1816: the Political Unconscious and the Poetic Fragment
- Matthew Sangster, ‘“You have not advertised out of it”: Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Francis Jeffrey on Authorship, Networks and Personalities’
- Tom Duggett, ‘Southey’s “New System”: the monitorial controversy and the making of the “entire man of letters”’
- Nicholas Halmi, ‘Coleridge’s Ecumenical Spinoza’

REVIEWS:
- Talia Schaffer, 'Leah Price. How To Do Things With Books in Victorian Britain'
- Daniel A. Novak, 'Linda M. Shires. Perspectives: Modes of Viewing and Knowing in Nineteenth-Century England'
- Andrew Thompson, 'John Rignall. George Eliot, European Novelist'
- David Kornhaber, 'David Kurnick. Empty Houses: Theatrical Failure and the Novel'
- Jason Camlot, 'James Walter Caufield. Overcoming Matthew Arnold: Ethics in Culture and Criticism'
- Jennifer Green-Lewis, 'Stephanie Spencer. Francis Bedford, Landscape Photography and Nineteenth-Century British Culture: The Artist as Entrepreneur'
- Heather Laird, 'Sara L. Maurer. The Dispossessed State: Narratives of Ownership in Nineteenth-Century Britain and Ireland'
- Maria Frawley, 'Louise Penner. Victorian Medicine and Social Reform: Florence Nightingale among the Novelists'
- Jenny Bourne Taylor, 'Elsie B. Michie. The Vulgar Question of Money: Heiresses, Materialism, and the Novel of Manners from Jane Austen to Henry James'
- Dehn Gilmore, 'Richard Nemesvari. Thomas Hardy, Sensationalism, and the Melodramatic Mode'
- Matthew Potolsky, 'Richard Dellamora. Radclyffe Hall: A Life in Writing'
- Marie-Luise Kohlke, 'Abigail Burnham Bloom and Mary Sanders Pollock (eds.). Victorian Literature and Film Adaptation'
- Shannon Sears, 'Vanessa L. Ryan. Thinking Without Thinking in the Victorian Novel'

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New Keats-Shelley Association of America Web site launched

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The Keats-Shelley Association of America has launched a new Web site.

It can be found at http://k-saa.org.

Of the new site, association president Stuart Curran writes,

I take distinct pleasure in announcing the inauguration of a much-revised and richer website for the Keats-Shelley Association of America (http://k-saa.org), a site that will lead not just to current information on events relevant to the younger Romantics, but also to programs on an international stage, including the almost weekly series of lectures and readings held by the Keats-Shelley Memorial House in Rome and the upcoming first-ever conference on Keats to be held at the Hampstead house where he wrote so much of his major poetry, which will take place the first weekend of May 2014. We anticipate keeping the website current in terms of such activities, but also as a means of providing quick access to scholarly resources on the internet germane to our interests. We have also instituted a PayPal account accessible from the site, allowing you to join the K-SAA or effortlessly to renew your membership there.

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CFP: Reassessing British Women Writers of the Romantic Period: A Special Issue of Women’s Writing

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Editors: Angela Rehbein and Andrew Winckles

It has been twenty years since the publication of Anne K. Mellor’s foundational study Romanticism and Gender (1993). Those twenty years have witnessed a wellspring of scholarship about Romantic-era women writers and a series of excellent critical biographies and anthologies. Nevertheless, much work remains to be done, both in terms of recovering forgotten women writers of the period and in more clearly contextualizing writers who have already been “recovered.” This special issue invites articles that provide new insight into the lives, writings, and cultural contexts of Romantic-era women. We seek to reconsider how we frame women’s lives and writings: what elements of their experiences do we privilege, and what do we ignore? Perhaps more important, what criteria do we employ when we make these determinations? Topics may include (but are not limited to): women and political writing, gender and genre, women and religion, gender and authorial identity, epistolary culture, literary mentorship, re-thinking periodization (Romantic v. Victorian), and re-assessing the canon.

Please submit articles of 4,000-7,000 words to Angela Rehbein or Andrew Winckles at:

Angela [dot] Rehbein [at] westliberty [dot] edu
awinckle [at] sienaheights [dot] edu (preferred)

OR

West Liberty University
208 University Drive
CU Box 130
West Liberty, WV 26074-0295

Submissions should be sent by January 15, 2014. Details of the journal’s house style can be found on the Women’s Writing web site.

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It's Alive! Shelley-Godwin Archive Launched

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The Shelley-Godwin Archive, launched on October 31, is now live. The new digital resource comprises the manuscripts of Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley.  For the first time ever, the widely scattered manuscripts of England’s “first family of writers” are being brought together in digital form online for worldwide use.  Visit the site at www.shelleygodwinarchive.org.

Since its release, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Chronicle of Higher Education, among others, have covered the new resource.

Created in partnership with the Bodleian Libraries of the University of Oxford and the MITH at the University of Maryland, the Shelley-Godwin Archive makes manuscripts and early editions of works by these four key writers of British Romantic literature freely available to the public online.  They will enable scholars to study, annotate, and manipulate manuscripts in ways that they could never do with paper or single images. Bringing all four writers together, it will allow scholars to unite the critical, historical, and biographical strands of their research.  Most of the primary material in the Shelley-Godwin Archive is drawn from The NYPL’s Carl H. Pforzheimer Collection of Shelley and His Circle and the Bodleian's Shelley holdings, the two foremost collections of these materials in the world.

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CFP: NASSR 2014 - Romantic Connections

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We invite proposals for an international Romanticism conference, to be
held at the University of Tokyo on June 13–15, 2014. This event will
bring together four scholarly societies from three continents: it is a
supernumerary conference of the North American Society for the Study
of Romanticism (NASSR), also supported by the British Association for
Romantic Studies (BARS), the German Society for English Romanticism
(GER), and the Japan Association of English Romanticism (JAER).

Over the last two decades, there has been sustained scholarly interest
in the connections between European Romanticism and the peoples,
cultures, and literatures of the rest of the world. While our approach
will be informed by the legacy of Saidian “Orientalism,” we are
particularly interested in models of intercultural connection which
refine or challenge totalizing models of domination and subordination.
We welcome papers that shed light upon the question of “connection”
from the broadest range of perspectives: imaginative, linguistic,
material, social, sexual, scientific, economic, and political.

Drawing on our location in Tokyo, we will use this conference to
consider the broader task of forging connections between Eastern and
Western literature and scholarship. In a Japanese context, the idea of
interpersonal “connection” (kizuna) takes on a different resonance,
because of its close connection to the project of recovery (saisei)
following the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake and tsunami. This
conference wishes to explore how such acts of cross-cultural
translation offer the possibility of reciprocal transformations of
meaning.

We welcome explorations of the reception of European Romanticism in
Asia and other regions of the world, as well as discussions of the
future status of Romanticism studies in a geographically diverse and
technologically connected scholarly world.

Proposals for papers (200–300 words) are due by November 30, 2013.

For more information, see the conference's website

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A new website for the Friends of Coleridge

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The Friends of Coleridge, an open society dedicated to the appreciation of the poet, have recently launched a new website that offers a number of useful resources.

They've provided a collection of graphic and written portraits by his contemporaries, an edited and contextualized selection of his poetry, a timeline of the major events in his life, and a guide to corrections to the Princeton Poetical Works series, among others.

In addition, the site offers information about the Friends, their semi-annual publication The Coleridge Bulletin, and their other Coleridge-oriented programs of interest to both scholars and enthusiasts.

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