Poets on Poets Reading

Laure-Anne Bosselaar reads "Mock on, mock on, Voltaire, Rousseau" by William Blake

In this installment, Laure-Anne Bosselaar reads "Mock on, mock on, Voltaire, Rousseau" by William Blake. Bosselaar is the author of The Hour Between Dog and Wolf and of Small Gods of Grief, winner of the Isabella Gardner Prize for Poetry for 2001.  She is the editor of Outsiders: Poems about Rebels, Exiles and Renegades and Urban Nature: Poems about Wildlife in the City. Her next anthology, Never Before: Poems about First Experiences will come out from Four Way Books in the fall of 2005.  She and her husband, poet Kurt Brown, have completed a book of translations from Flemish poet, Herman de Coninck: The Plural of Happiness, which the Field Translations Series will publish in 2006.  She teaches a graduate poetry workshop at Sarah Lawrence College.

Laure-Anne Bosselaar reads "The Garden of Love" by William Blake

In this installment, Laure-Anne Bosselaar reads "The Garden of Love" by William Blake. Bosselaar is the author of The Hour Between Dog and Wolf and of Small Gods of Grief, winner of the Isabella Gardner Prize for Poetry for 2001.  She is the editor of Outsiders: Poems about Rebels, Exiles and Renegades and Urban Nature: Poems about Wildlife in the City. Her next anthology, Never Before: Poems about First Experiences will come out from Four Way Books in the fall of 2005.  She and her husband, poet Kurt Brown, have completed a book of translations from Flemish poet, Herman de Coninck: The Plural of Happiness, which the Field Translations Series will publish in 2006.  She teaches a graduate poetry workshop at Sarah Lawrence College.

Cleopatra Mathis reads "A Poison Tree" by William Blake

In this installment, Cleopatra Mathis reads “A Poison Tree” by William Blake. Mathis's sixth book of poems, White Sea, will be published in 2005 by Sarabande Books. She is the recipient of many grants and awards, including two National Endowment for the Arts grants, a fellowship from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, The Robert Frost Award, and The Peter Lavin Award for Younger Poets from the Academy of American Poets. She has taught English and Creative Writing at Dartmouth College since 1982.

Cleopatra Mathis reads "The Tyger" by William Blake

In this installment, Cleopatra Mathis reads “The Tyger” by William Blake. Mathis's sixth book of poems, White Sea, will be published in 2005 by Sarabande Books. She is the recipient of many grants and awards, including two National Endowment for the Arts grants, a fellowship from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, The Robert Frost Award, and The Peter Lavin Award for Younger Poets from the Academy of American Poets. She has taught English and Creative Writing at Dartmouth College since 1982.

Elise Paschen reads "To Autumn" by John Keats

In this installment, Elise Paschen reads “To Autumn” by John Keats. Paschen is the author of Infidelities, winner of the Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize, and of Houses: Coasts.  Her poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The New Republic, Ploughshares, and Shenandoah, among other magazines, and in numerous anthologies, including Poetry 180: A Turning Back to Poetry; The POETRY Anthology, 1912-2002; Reinventing the Enemy's Language: Contemporary Native Women's Writings of North America; and A Formal Feeling Comes: Poems in Form by Contemporary Women.  Former Director of the Poetry Society of America, she is the co-founder of "Poetry in Motion," a nation-wide program which places poetry posters in subways and buses.  Co-editor of Poetry in Motion, Poetry in Motion from Coast to Coast, and Poetry Speaks, she teaches in the Writing Program at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.  Learn more about Paschen's work here.

Michelle Boisseau reads "The world is too much with us" by William Wordsworth

In this installment, Michelle Boisseau reads “The world is too much with us” by William Wordsworth. Boisseau was educated at Ohio University (B.A., M.A.) and the University of Houston (Ph.D.). Her books of poetry include Trembling Air (University of Arkansas Press, 2003); Understory, winner of the Morse Prize (Northeastern University Press, 1996); and No Private Life (Vanderbilt, 1990). She is also author of the popular text Writing Poems (Longman), in its 6th edition.  Her poems have appeared in The Yale Review, Threepenny Review, The Gettysburg Review, The Southern Review, Shenandoah, Poetry, and Ploughshares. Her work has received a National Endowment for the Arts poetry fellowship and awards from the Poetry Society of America. She is a professor of English at the University of Missouri-Kansas City where she also is associate editor of BkMk Press and the coordinator of the Creative Writing program.

Randall Couch reads "The Yellowhammer" by John Clare

In this installment, Randall Couch reads “The Yellowhammer” by John Clare. Couch received a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts fellowship in poetry in 2000 and an MFA from Warren Wilson College in 2003.  He teaches at Arcadia University and serves on the planning committee of Penn's Kelly Writers House. He is a contributor to the critical anthology Gabriela Mistral: The Audacious Traveler, edited by Marjorie Agosín (Ohio University Press, 2003).

Forrest Gander reads "Frost at Midnight" by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

In this installment, Forrest Gander reads "Frost at Midnight" by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Gander's most recent books include Torn Awake (New Directions, 2001) and Faithful Existence: Essays (forthcoming from Shoemaker & Hoard).  Princeton University Press will bring out Gander’s translation, with Kent Johnson, of The Night by Jaime Saenz.

download MP3

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, “Frost at Midnight”

The Frost performs its secret ministry,

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Poets on Poets Reading