Poets on Poets Reading

Kevin Goodan reads "The world is too much with us" by William Wordsworth

In this installment, Kevin Goodan reads “The world is too much with us” by William Wordsworth. Goodan was raised in Montana, and fought forest fires for many years. He attended the University of Montana, and the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. His first book, In the Ghost-House Acquainted, was published by Alice James Books in 2004, and recieved the L.L. Winship/PEN New England Award for 2005. He currently lives on a small farm in western Massachusetts.

Hermine Pinson reads "Music, when Soft Voices die" by Percy Bysshe Shelley

In this installment, Hermine Pinson reads “Music, when Soft Voices die” by Percy Bysshe Shelley. Pinson, a native of Beaumont, Texas, is the author of two collections of poetry, Ashe and Mama Yetta and Other Poems, both with Wings Press. She has also published short fiction and critical essays in such publications as Callaloo; AfricanAmerican Review; Texas Bound: Short Stories by and about Texas Women; Konch, Commonwealth: Contemporary Poets of Virginia, and Verse. She is presently working on a new collection to be published in the fall of 2007.

Keetje Kuipers reads "Washing Day" by Anna Laetitia Barbauld

In this installment, Keetje Kuipers reads “Washing Day” by Anna Laetitia Barbauld. Kuipers is a native of the Northwest. She earned her B.A. at Swarthmore College and her M.F.A. at the University of Oregon. She has received fellowships from Oregon Literary Arts and the Vermont Studio Center. She is also the recipient of the 2007 Margery Davis Boyden Wilderness Writing Residency, which will provide her with a year of solitude in Oregon's Rogue River Valley. She will use her time there to complete work on her manuscript, Beautiful in the Mouth, which contains poems currently published or forthcoming in Prairie Schooner, Atlanta Review, West Branch, Painted Bride Quarterly, Parthenon West Review, and Faultline, among others. She lives in Missoula, Montana with her dog, Bishop.

Suzanna Wise reads "The Proverbs of Hell" from "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell" by William Blake

In this installment, Suzanna Wise reads “The Proverbs of Hell” from “The Marriage of Heaven and Hell” by William Blake. Wise is the author of the poetry collection The Kingdom of the Subjunctive (Alice James Books, 2000). Her poetry has appeared in the anthologies American Poetry: The Next Generation and Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century, and in the journals Tikkun, Pierogi Press, Boston Review, Fence, among others. She has taught creative writing at Middlebury College in Vermont, and at the Pratt Institute and Poets' House in New York City

Ira Lightman reads "Ecclesiastical Sonnets, IV. Druidical Excommunication" by William Wordsworth

In this installment, Ira Lightman reads “Ecclesiastical Sonnets, IV. Druidical Excommunication" by William Wordsworth. Lightman has been publishing pamphlets with experimental presses for fifteen years. He moved to northeast England in 2000, and has become involved in both private and public art. Ira became interested in Wordsworth upon moving to the northeast (though Wordsworth is from the northwest), which he partly attributes to an improved ear for northern speech. You can visit his links page here.

Ira Lightman reads "Ecclesiastical Sonnets, II. Conjectures"

In this installment, Ira Lightman reads “Ecclesiastical Sonnets, II. Conjectures” by William Wordsworth. Lightman has been publishing pamphlets with experimental presses for fifteen years. He moved to northeast England in 2000, and has become involved in both private and public art. Ira became interested in Wordsworth upon moving to the northeast (though Wordsworth is from the northwest), which he partly attributes to an improved ear for northern speech. You can visit his links page here.

Jennifer Moxley reads "Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood"

In this installment, Jennifer Moxley reads “Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood” by William Wordsworth. Moxley is the author of three books of poetry: Often Capital (Flood 2005), The Sense Record (Edge 2002; Salt 2003), and Imagination Verses (Tender Buttons 1996; Salt 2003). Her translation of the French poet Jacqueline Risset's 1976 book The Translation Begins was published by Burning Deck in 1996. She is poetry editor of The Baffler, contributing editor of The Poker, and advisor to The Modern Review. She lives in Orono, Maine. For links to her work online, reviews, and more biographical information, click here.

Lindsay Ahl reads "Hymn to Intellectual Beauty" by Percy Bysshe Shelley

In this installment, Lindsay Ahl reads “Hymn to Intellectual Beauty” by Percy Bysshe Shelley. Ahl is the author of the novel Desire, published by Coffee House Press. Her work has appeared in BOMB Magazine, Global City Review, Fiction magazine, and others. Her poetry and art appears on the web site www.sfpoetry.org, Issue # 45 April 2006, and she was a fiction fellow at Bread Loaf in 2004. She is the editor of Bliss, an arts & culture magazine, for which she has interviewed W.S. Merwin, Jim Harrison, Ted Kooser, A.S. Byatt, and others.

Charles Flowers reads "It is a beateous evening, calm and free" by William Wordsworth

In this installment, Charles Flowers reads “It is a beauteous evening, calm and free” by William Wordsworth. Flowers graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Vanderbilt University and received his M.F.A. in Poetry from the University of Oregon. His poems have appeared in Gulf Coast, Barrow Street, Indiana Review, and Puerto del Sol. Flowers is also the founding editor of BLOOM, a journal for lesbian and gay writing that Edmund White has called "the most exciting new queer literary publication to emerge in years." Currently, he is Executive Director of the Lambda Literary Foundation, the country's leading literary organization for LGBTQ writers and readers.

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