Austin

OpenCalais Metadata: Latitude: 

30.267153

OpenCalais Metadata: Longitude: 

-97.743061

OpenCalais Metadata: ContainedByState: 

Texas

Archive of Wordsworth-Coleridge Association Sessions at Modern Language Association Annual Conventions (1990- )

Romantic Studies at the MLA, 1990-1998
Wordsworth-Coleridge Association Sessions

1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998

1990

New Approaches to Romantic Critical Biography

Wordsworth-Coleridge Association. Presiding: James K. Chandler, Univ. of Chicago

1. "Reflexive Biography: Three Men and a Maid," Jerome Colin Christensen, Johns Hopkins Univ.
2. "New Historicist Biography: Alternative Tropology or Contradiction in Terms?" Andrew Cooper, Univ. of Texas, Austin
3. "Dead Poet's Society," Karen Swann, Williams Coll.

Owning, Imagination, Imagining Ownership: Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Intellectual Property

Section: 

Archive of Romantic Division Sessions at Modern Language Association Annual Conventions (1990- )

Romantic Studies at the MLA, 1990-
English Romantic Period Division Sessions

1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998

1990

Romantic Elegy: The Elegiac Mode in Romantic Verse I

Division on the English Romantic Period. Presiding: Stephen M. Parrish, Cornell Univ.

1. "Elegy into Aura," Carol L. Bernstein, Bryn Mawr Coll.
2. "Rewriting Pastoral Elegy: Wordsworth's The Brothers," Bruce Edward Graver, Providence Coll.
3. "'Where Once . . . We Stood Rejoicing': Wordsworth, Scott, and Musings near Aquapendente," Stephen Gill, Oxford Univ.

Romantic Elegy: The Elegiac Mode in Romantic Verse II

Section: 

"The Infection of Robert Bloomfield: Terrorizing The Farmer’s Boy"

This article argues that Robert Bloomfield’s seminal text The Farmer’s Boy is a much darker and more troubled poem than has been appreciated. Although recent criticism has begun to explore some of the poem’s ideological complexities, there is still a prevailing tendency to locate its imaginative resources and strengths in its depiction of a lost pastoral world of rural English labor. Haywood aims to break out of this pastoralist mold by reading the poem as a psycho-biographical allegory of Bloomfield’s unresolved feelings about separation, loss, social mobility, patronage, and success. By intensifying and magnifying the more violent conventions of the georgic, Bloomfield converts the poem into what John Barrell (writing about De Quincey) calls “narratives of trauma and narratives of reparation” (22). The pain, terror, and guilt of these “narratives” reflect not only Bloomfield’s troubled poetical formation but also capture the counter-revolutionary paranoia and repression of the late 1790s. Although Haywood's interpretation uses the text to speculate about Bloomfield’s memories of his early life, his conclusions are supported by copious illustrations and supportive evidence from Bloomfield’s letters.
December 2011

Resource (Taxonomy): 

Index of People

September, 2009

Section: 

89. Robert Bloomfield to George Bloomfield, 23 June 1802 

September, 2009

Section: 

Pages

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