Jerusalem

OpenCalais Metadata: Latitude: 

31.47

OpenCalais Metadata: Longitude: 

35.1

Johnson, "Contingencies, Exigencies, and Editorial Praxis: The Case of the 2008 Norton Blake"

In updating the Norton Critical Edition of _Blake's Poetry and Designs_ (1979; 2008) to include the entire textual portion of _Jerusalem_, editors Mary Lynn Johnson and John E. Grant attempted to continue engaging and informing first-time readers of Blake within the constraints of the publisher's current editorial and fiscal policies. This anecdotal case history considers the influence of unforeseen contingencies and exigencies in book production upon high-minded editorial praxis. This essay appears in _Editing and Reading Blake_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Fuller, "Modernizing Blake's Text: Syntax, Rhythm, Rhetoric"

This essay discusses the various difficulties of all methods of presenting Blake's text arguing that all forms, including facsimile and apparently purist letterpress, involve characteristic misrepresentations. It then argues the positive value of modernizing punctuation. Helping the reader to understand Blake's syntax releases attention to other expressive aspects of poetic form, particularly rhythm and the quasi-musical structures of Blake's rhetoric.. This essay appears in _Editing and Reading Blake_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Ferguson-Wagstaffe, "'Points of Contact': Blake and Whitman"

This essay seeks to reopen a transatlantic dialogue between Blake and Whitman, and illuminate a material point of contact (Whitman’s tomb)through a close reading of these poets’ rhetorical points of contact. The author focuses on Blake's engraving, 'Death's Door,' which served as a model for Whitman's tomb, Whitman’s responses to Blake in his letters and notes, their shared status as prophetic poets, and their poetics of revision. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism

"Points of Contact": Blake and Whitman

Sarah Ferguson-Wagstaffe, University of Pennsylvania

  1. On September 29, 1890 Whitman enclosed a rough sketch of his tomb in a letter to his literary executor, Richard Maurice Bucke.

    "If the acts have been perform'd let the Bard himself witness": William Blake's Milton and MOO space

    This essay explores what MOO space can tell us about Blake's Milton and, conversely, what Blake's Milton can tell us abut MOO space. Specifically, this essay maintains that the performative potential of the immersive textuality of MOO space opens new possibilities for critical approaches to one of Blake's most challenging poems. By eliminating the distance between the fictional character within a text and its reader/player, MOO space arguably allows for a sense of the aesthetic experience as an intersubjective event. In this way, Blake's Milton in MOO space allows for the experiential realization of the non-linearity of Blake's text in ways that are inaccessible for traditional modes of scholarly practice.
    January 2005

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    Unlocking Language: Self-Similarity in Blake’s Jerusalem

    In the first part of the essay, Yoder outlines John Locke's theory of language as it is presented in Book III of the Essay concerning Human Understanding. Locke identifies the flaws in language as obscurity and instability, and he offers a five-point plan to repair these flaws primarily by eliminating figurative language and limiting the meaning of words to what they have meant in the past. In the second part of the essay, focusing primarily on William Blake's Jerusalem, Yoder argues that Blake offers a theory of language contrary to Locke's theory, one in which language might be described as fractal, a term borrowed from chaos theory. In Blake's system, signfication expands and contracts across a sliding scale of analogous linguistic structures; the standard of these fractal iterations is the human form. Yoder also argues that this understanding of language helps to explain the problem of narrative in Blake's poem.
    March 2001

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