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Reading Jane Austen in Wartime

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August, 2008

Reading Jane Austen in Wartime

Mary A. Favret, Indiana University-Bloomington


  1. Why teach Jane Austen in wartime? An old commonplace has it that Jane Austen's novels showed little awareness of a world disrupted by revolution and war. There are many versions of this thought, but I will cite only one of the more sophisticated, coming from another wartime novelist, Virginia Woolf: 

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Other Versions of the Wat Tyler Legend--An Annotated Bibliography

August, 2004

William Blake and the Study of Virtual Space: Adapting "The Crystal Cabinet" to a New Medium

In re-envisioning virtual reality, we look beyond the simplistic recreation of the physical world and grow to understand it in a Mallarinéan-Blakean fashion, as a program that executes orders upon the senses. From this vantage point, the work of William Blake is a uniquely powerful departure point for the exploration of virtual space. Compared with the conventional works that seek to mirror reality or employ the virtual in support of video game narratives, his work forms a beachhead of compelling insight for a new and undiscovered medium. Within the Virtual Crystal Cabinet, Blakean textuality engages our new computer-driven reality. Poetic text, images, and architectural elements are blended through graphic design techniques, filmic conventions and theories of human computer interaction.
January 2005

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Innocence/Game/Songs/Blake

Reading, Begging, Paul de Man

Focusing on Edgar Allan Poe's "The Man of the Crowd" and Heinrich von Kleist's "The Beggarwoman of Locarno," this essay explores Paul de Man's claim that reading is "a praxis that thematizes its own thesis about the impossibility of thematization." In Poe's story, the cryptic assertion that a particular book does not allow itself to be read becomes part of a larger structure of self-reference in which legibility is no longer a factor of clarity or obscurity. In Kleist, the notion that language can tell a coherent story about its own signifying capacities is unsettled as even the most rudimentary distinction between form and content proves to be at once too specific and too abstract. In the final analysis, Kleist's work confronts us with an event of language that is governed by neither a representational nor a lexical logic. From this perspective, de Man's understanding of allegory helps us to see why textual reflexivity cannot be modeled on a figure of historical self-consciousness.
May 2005

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Introduction - Once Only Imagined

 

Page 1, Once Only Imagined

 

March 2003

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Redfield, "Wordsworth, Poetry, Romanticism: An Interview with Geoffrey Hartman"

This text consists of an interview with the great Romanticist and Wordsworth scholar Geoffrey Hartman. Romanticism is a mainstay of the conversation between Hartman and Marc Redfield, centering on Hartman’s life-long shaping of Wordsworth as the paradoxically both radical and measured bearer of modernity. Their discussion also touches upon a wide range of topics that include the necessity of a multi-linguistic approach to literature, the nature of terror, and how Hartman and Harold Bloom read differently. This essay appears in _Geoffrey Hartman and Harold Bloom: Two Interviews_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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About this Hypertext

October, 1997

About this Hypertext


The text

This hypertext edition of Mary Shelley's 1826 novel, The Last Man, is encoded in HTML, with some extensions for HTML 2.0, including a limited use of tables and frames. It will work best with Netscape 2.0 or later; earlier browsers may not display everything properly.

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