London

OpenCalais Metadata: Latitude: 

51.517124

OpenCalais Metadata: Longitude: 

-0.106196

OpenCalais Metadata: ContainedByState: 

Greater London

Note: phantasmagoria

October, 1997

The phantasmagoria or magic lantern show was a common attraction in early nineteenth-century London. Like other diversions of popular culture at the time--the panorama, diorama, and transparency, and (arguably) much contemporary drama--it exploited a taste for sensory stimulation and optical special effects based on technology, often in conjunction with sentimental or gothic themes.

Section: 

Paley, "Apocalypse Without Millenium" Part 2

October, 1997

Mary Shelley's The Last Man: Apocalypse Without Millenium

by Morton D. Paley



[ . . . continued]

The idea of a millennium does surface repeatedly in The Last Man but it always turns out to be a will-of-the-wisp. This is nowhere so evident as in the speculations of the astronomer Merrival, whose views seem ironically compounded of the most perfectibilian aspects of William Godwin's and Percy Bysshe Shelley's.

Section: 

Note: London

October, 1997

London


The action of the early portion of the novel is divided between Cumberland, Windsor, and London, following to some extent the traditional rhythm of town and country existence in the nineteenth century, the sporting, social, and artistic "season," which was tied to the political calendar. The aristocracy and gentry usually came into London from country estates in the winter, in anticipation of the opening of Parliament.

Section: 

Note: Lister

October, 1997

"The Author of Granby" (London: Colburn, 1826) was T. H. Lister (1800-1842), one of the "Silver Fork" novelists of the late 1820s associated with the publisher Henry Colburn, the same publisher (and also in 1826) of The Last Man. Colburn was in addition the publisher of the New Monthly Magazine, in which Mary Shelley published short fiction, beginning, perhaps, with the anonymous "Rome in the First and the Nineteenth Centuries."

Section: 

Bibliography

October, 1997

Bibliography:

Works incorporated in the hypertext (and a selected list of works cited)


Alkon, Paul K. The Origins of Futuristic Fiction. Athens and London: University of Georgia Press, 1987.

Anonymous ("XB"). "The Last Man." Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine. March 1826. 284-86.

Bebbington,A. G. "The Shelleys' House?" Notes & Queries 216 (May 1971), 163-65.

Section: 

Note: Almack's

October, 1997

Almack's Assembly Rooms was a fashionable social spot in the nineteenth century, located in King's Street, St. James, London. It was named for its founder, who also started a well- known gaming (gambling) club.


Section: 

"On The Medusa of Leonardo da Vinci" by Percy Bysshe Shelley

February, 1997

This on-line version of "On The Medusa of Leonardo da Vinci" by Percy Bysshe Shelley is edited by Melissa J. Sites and Neil Fraistat. The text is taken from Posthumous Poems of Percy Bysshe Shelley, edited by Mary W. Shelley (London: John and Henry L. Hunt, 1824), pages 139-40. Mary Shelley's transcription of the poem can be found in Bodleian MS Shelley adds. d.7, pp. 97-8, 100, reproduced in the Garland Bodleian Shelley Manuscripts, volume 2.

Section: 

Shelley, Medusa, and the Perils of Ekphrasis

February, 1997

Shelley, Medusa, and the Perils of Ekphrasis

GRANT F. SCOTT


This article reproduced as part of
the Romantic Circles Electronic Edition of Shelley's "Medusa"
from The Romantic Imagination: Literature and Art in England and Germany, ed. Frederick Burwick and Jurgen Klein (Studies in comparative literature 6), Amsterdam/Atlanta, GA: Rodopi, 1996. 315- 332.

Adapted for hypertext by Melissa J. Sites.

Section: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - London