Rome

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41.9

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12.5

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Province of Rome

Oxford

January, 2006

Oxford

In 1810, after graduating from Eton, Shelley entered University College at Oxford for a brief but tumultuous stay. From the High Street entrance, the place looks much as it did in his time.

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_Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine_ Review of _Valperga_, March 1823, Feb 18, 1826

March, 1998
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, XIII (March 1823), p. 283-293.
Review of Valperga

Valperga; or the Life and Adventures of Castruccio, Prince of Lucca. By the Author of "Frankenstein." In Three Volumes. London: Printed for G. and W.B. Whittaker, Ave-Maria-Lane. 1823.

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Heinowitz, "The Allure of the Same: Robert Southey's Welsh Indians and the Rhetoric of Good Colonialism"

This essay examines the rhetoric of sameness (as opposed to the more familiar rhetoric of otherness) that characterized British imperial interest in Spanish American during the Romantic era. To do this, it analyzes how Robert Southey's 1805 poem Madoc, a Welsh-Mexican epic set in the twelfth century, builds on the Burkean plea for colonial benevolence in India in order to mount its own vindication of 'good' imperialism in Spanish America. Southey's struggle to exalt traditional colonialism as the great unifier of conqueror and conquered was dogged, however, by internal contradictions as well as by Britain's increasingly aggressive presence in Spanish America. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Rajan, "The Abyss of the Past": Psychoanalysis in Schelling's Ages of the World (1815)

Focusing on the differences between the three versions of Schelling's _Ages of the World_, this paper takes up the invention of psychoanalysis in the third (1815) version. The third version, unlike the more idealistic first and second vesions, intoroduces terms such as the unconscious, inhibition, and crisis, contains a crucial section on mesmerism, and is structured around the trauma of onto- and phylogenesis. The paper also explores the larger epistemic consequences of looking for a return and retreat of the origin of psychoanalysis before its institutional emergence. This essay appears in _Romantic Psyche and Psychoanalysis_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Potkay, "Captivation and Liberty in Wordsworth's Poems on Music"

This essay addresses the Orphic power of music to seduce and distract--to wring the will of its freedom--in a way that is not incompatible with civic liberty. I focus on two poems from Wordsworth's '1807 Poems, in Two Volumes': the entrancing 'Solitary Reaper' and the poem in which Wordsworth directly addresses the allurements of sound, 'The Power of Music.'

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Darkness Audible: Negative Capability and Mark Doty’s "Nocturne in Black and Gold"

Beginning from Doty's commentary on Keats's "Endymion" manuscript, this essay examines the way the poetic process is figured as a conversation between the given and the made but also between the dark, unconscious world and the active, intellectual world of the will. Using Blanchot's and Tiffany's work on the role of obscurity in the lyric, the essay considers Doty's "Nocture in Black and Gold" as an exploration of leave taking in the form of an embodiment of shadow. Beginning with the poem's epigraph from St. Augustine, "Shadow is the queen of colors," the article traces how the poem investigates the color and substance of shadow or nothingness via an engagement with three sources: Whistler's painting, after which the poem is titled, Keats's notion of a happiness of the moment, and the figure of the Queen of the Night from Mozart's The Magic Flute. Doty's reading of Keats locates the origins of poetry in the very nothingness over which Keats's things of beauty are meant to triumph. For Doty, poetic description, like Blanchot's infinitely eroding cadaver, marks the temporal locus of the body, even as it moves into a nowhere, an obscurity that is, by conventional definition, beyond language. Doty's exploration of this nowhere brings him finally to the burnished darkness of the ordinary sublime, a place of intimacy restored.
July 2003

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Crocco, "The Ruins of Empire: Nationalism, Art, and Empire in Hemans's Modern Greece"

This study discusses the importance of the trope of ruins and the paradigm of decline and fall to the rhetoric of nationalism and imperialism in Felicia Hemans's Modern Greece. Contingent to this subject is an exploration of the ways in which female writers of the Romantic Period were able to enter the public sphere and broach the often male-gendered topoi of nationalism, travel, and empire by adopting differing patriotic stances and unique narratological structures. This essay appears in _Romanticism and Patriotism: Nation, Empire, Bodies, Rhetoric_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Lewis/Gounod's Bleeding Nonne: An Introduction and Translation of the Scribe/Delavigne Libretto

Librettists Scribe and Delavigne transformed M.G. Lewis's Gothic episode in The Monk into a tale conforming to the conventions of mid-nineteenth-century French "grand opera." Charles Gounod's setting of this libretto closed after eleven performances in the autumn of 1854 and has never been revived. The production was beset with problems arising from opera-house and prima-donna politics, but its failure may also imply crucial cultural transformations in Europe since the revolutionary 1790's when Lewis had published his novel. A translation of the libretto gives Anglo-American scholars ready access to this paradoxical opera in the Gothic tradition.
May 2005

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"An assiduous frequenter of the Italian opera": Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound and the opera buffa

By the time he came to add act IV to the original three acts of "Prometheus Unbound" in late 1819, Percy Bysshe Shelley had amassed a diverse set of musical experiences, ranging from the first London performance of Rossini's "Il barbiere di Siviglia" in March of 1818 to the grand festivities or "funzioni" in Rome during Easter week in 1819. While critics and reviewers of the past two hundred years have struggled to find a suitable analogy for "Prometheus Unbound" in literature, it seems possible that Shelley had non-literary models in mind. Indeed, the world of music provides a clear parallel to Shelley's lyrical drama in the form of the Italian "opera buffa" that so delighted the poet and his friends during the London seasons in 1817 and 1818. This essay argues that the organization of discourse and the specific dramatic arrangement of Shelley's "Prometheus Unbound" have strong affinities with the Italian operas of his day, particularly the works of Mozart and Rossini.
May 2005

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