Europe

Vol 1. No. 2 - Index

February, 2005

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Vol 1. No. 1 - Index

February, 2005

Section: 

Lee, "'An Anti-Democratic Habit of Feeling': Nationalism and the Rhetoric of Toryism in O'Sullivan's Democratic Review"

By shifting the issue of American nationalism from writers and anxieties of aesthetic independence to anxieties about readers and ideological dependency, I hope to show how the Democratic Review introduced a particular brand of democratic personality and aesthetics which was reinforced by the literature printed in its pages. A material study of creative works in the Democratic Review alongside the writings of its editor O’Sullivan reveals a nationalist strategy that focused on combating British literary power over Americans. This essay explores O’Sullivan’s vital contribution to Jacksonian nationalism through the assembly of authors like Hawthorne and a politicized literary charge that imagined Britain as the moral and sympathetic antithesis to the United States. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Newman, "Introduction: A History of Transatlantic Romanticism"

Newman argues that Romanticism was a definitively international cultural movement, and that most literary scholarship examining the period has been deformed by rigid disciplinary boundaries that follow national borders. While early scholars of Transatlantic Romanticism either overemphasized literary nationalism or attempted to argue it out of existence, a third wave, including Richard Gravil and Paul Giles, has emerged that sets a new standard for empirical cultural analysis, freed of nationalist distortions but closely attentive to the power of nationalism as one of the most fundamental structures of identity during the Romantic century. The essays in Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic show that Romanticism was a complex and multivalent response to the combined and uneven rise of capitalist social relations around the Atlantic Rim. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Heinowitz, "The Allure of the Same: Robert Southey's Welsh Indians and the Rhetoric of Good Colonialism"

This essay examines the rhetoric of sameness (as opposed to the more familiar rhetoric of otherness) that characterized British imperial interest in Spanish American during the Romantic era. To do this, it analyzes how Robert Southey's 1805 poem Madoc, a Welsh-Mexican epic set in the twelfth century, builds on the Burkean plea for colonial benevolence in India in order to mount its own vindication of 'good' imperialism in Spanish America. Southey's struggle to exalt traditional colonialism as the great unifier of conqueror and conquered was dogged, however, by internal contradictions as well as by Britain's increasingly aggressive presence in Spanish America. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Cardoso, "Children Playing by the Sea: the Dynamics of Appropriation in the Brazilian Romantic Novel"

For the romantics in nineteenth-century Brazil, who lived in a recently independent nation, the novel had the mission of creating a national identity. This identity, however, was intensely relational, being built up on the absorption of literary models generated in Europe, and on the playful appropriation of these models. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Ripley, "Introduction: Editing Blake"

This essay examines the historical and technical difficulties of editing William Blake, surveying the key problems of textual and visual representation between the mid-nineteenth and early twenty-first century. This essay appears in _Editing and Reading Blake_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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The Uses and Abuses of Historicism: Halperin and Shelley on the Otherness of Ancient Greek Sexuality

Through a comparison of Percy Shelley's understanding of the alterity of Ancient Greek Sex with David Halperin's, Sha argues that alterity functions on the one hand to insist upon the otherness of Greek sex, and, on the other hand, to declare one's self-consciousness about that otherness. Because self-consciousness and otherness are necessarily at odds, alterity has become a post-modern form of objectivity. Once one declares one's allegiances, one is free to make the other other.
January 2006

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