France

OpenCalais Metadata: Latitude: 

46.0

OpenCalais Metadata: Longitude: 

2.0

Note: Calais

October, 1997

Calais


Calais, French port city on the Strait of Dover, is a traditional point of entry to the Continent from England. It was occupied by Edward III in 1347, and remained under the control of England until 1558. In 1796 Edmund Burke referred to this historical role, saying that Calais had been "the key of France, and the bridle in the mouth of that power . . . . " (Letter to a Noble Lord, p. 168).

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Bibliography

October, 1997

Bibliography:

Works incorporated in the hypertext (and a selected list of works cited)


Alkon, Paul K. The Origins of Futuristic Fiction. Athens and London: University of Georgia Press, 1987.

Anonymous ("XB"). "The Last Man." Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine. March 1826. 284-86.

Bebbington,A. G. "The Shelleys' House?" Notes & Queries 216 (May 1971), 163-65.

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Ferguson, "Educational Rationalization / Sublime Reason"

Educational discussion in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century increasingly focused on actions—what someone could be seen to do—and the values of those actions in a social context. Although Rousseau and Bentham stress the evaluations that the physical world or the social world continually supply a child's actions, Kant extends his view of morality even past their concern with disambiguated, nonformulaic action to argue that the centrality of moral thought is obvious in ordinary conversation—the methodized gossip of what he takes to be moral entertainments. This essay appears in _The Sublime and Education_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Braider, "Unlearning the Sublime"

The essay argues that, if the sublime continues to fascinate scholars and philosophers long after the critical dismantling of its metaphysical underpinnings in Kant, Hegel, and Romanticism, it is because it has found a refuge in the topology of critical thought as such. The solution of the ongoing problem of the sublime accordingly lies in investigating the afterlife this topology grants not only the sublime itself but metaphysics even (if not especially) for writers like Benjamin, Derrida, Agamben, and Zizek committed to the skeptical and/or materialist deconstruction of the transcendental pretensions the sublime keeps alive. This essay appears in _The Sublime and Education_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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