Greece

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38.3228275976

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22.2591633135

The Uses and Abuses of Historicism: Halperin and Shelley on the Otherness of Ancient Greek Sexuality

Through a comparison of Percy Shelley's understanding of the alterity of Ancient Greek Sex with David Halperin's, Sha argues that alterity functions on the one hand to insist upon the otherness of Greek sex, and, on the other hand, to declare one's self-consciousness about that otherness. Because self-consciousness and otherness are necessarily at odds, alterity has become a post-modern form of objectivity. Once one declares one's allegiances, one is free to make the other other.
January 2006

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"That Obscure Object of Historical Desire"

In his essay, Halperin responds to the essays collected in this issue, many of which respond to his book How to Do the History of Homosexuality, touching upon the history of sexuality, homosexuality, subjectivity, and desire, especially as reflected in the sexual discourse of Michel Foucault.
January 2006

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Table of Contents - Romanticism and Patriotism: Nation, Empire, Bodies, Rhetoric - Romantic Era

Romanticism and Patriotism: Nation, Empire, Bodies, Rhetoric
Table of Contents

Crocco, "The Ruins of Empire: Nationalism, Art, and Empire in Hemans's Modern Greece"

This study discusses the importance of the trope of ruins and the paradigm of decline and fall to the rhetoric of nationalism and imperialism in Felicia Hemans's Modern Greece. Contingent to this subject is an exploration of the ways in which female writers of the Romantic Period were able to enter the public sphere and broach the often male-gendered topoi of nationalism, travel, and empire by adopting differing patriotic stances and unique narratological structures. This essay appears in _Romanticism and Patriotism: Nation, Empire, Bodies, Rhetoric_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Paley, "Apocalypse Without Millenium" Part 2

October, 1997

Mary Shelley's The Last Man: Apocalypse Without Millenium

by Morton D. Paley



[ . . . continued]

The idea of a millennium does surface repeatedly in The Last Man but it always turns out to be a will-of-the-wisp. This is nowhere so evident as in the speculations of the astronomer Merrival, whose views seem ironically compounded of the most perfectibilian aspects of William Godwin's and Percy Bysshe Shelley's.

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Note: Italy

October, 1997

Italy


Percy Shelley addressed it as "Paradise of exiles" (Julian and Maddalo) and Byron made it his adopted country until his final sojourn in Greece. Italy was for Mary Shelley's circle a site of symbolic, artistic, cultural--and actual--exile, as well as an ancient ideal standard of civilization against which to measure the fall into servitude and general failings of the present day. (See this 1824 sonnet by Guidiccioni.)

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Note: Greece

October, 1997

Greece


In the early nineteenth century Greece was the focus of a cultural movement, an idealizing "Hellenism," and international political involvement in the War of Independence against the Ottoman Empire. (For a work that strategically represents both the idealization and political involvement, see P. B. Shelley's Hellas [external link to one chorus from the play].)

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