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William Gifford to Edward Copleston (4/11/1811) - Correspondence Archive

February, 2005

Section: 

A Chronology for 1808

February, 2005

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Heinowitz, "The Allure of the Same: Robert Southey's Welsh Indians and the Rhetoric of Good Colonialism"

This essay examines the rhetoric of sameness (as opposed to the more familiar rhetoric of otherness) that characterized British imperial interest in Spanish American during the Romantic era. To do this, it analyzes how Robert Southey's 1805 poem Madoc, a Welsh-Mexican epic set in the twelfth century, builds on the Burkean plea for colonial benevolence in India in order to mount its own vindication of 'good' imperialism in Spanish America. Southey's struggle to exalt traditional colonialism as the great unifier of conqueror and conquered was dogged, however, by internal contradictions as well as by Britain's increasingly aggressive presence in Spanish America. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Jager, "Introduction"

In this introduction to the volume, Jager argues that secularism has remained an obscure topic within romantic studies. Noting that 'a genealogy of romantic secularism has yet to be written,' Jager sketches some aspects of such a genealogy by noting the persistence of romantic thinking—about the symbol, for example—in secular thinking. Cosmopolitanism, he notes, has been more widely considered alongside romanticism, but here again the relationship of secularism to 'romantic cosmopolitanism' has tended to remain invisible. Is cosmopolitanism part of a secular project? Or do the conditions of postmodernity in fact make possible a religious cosmopolitanism of a kind anticipated by some romantic texts? This essay appears in _Secularism, Cosmopolitanism, and Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Underwood, "Culture and Discontinuity (in the 1840s and in Foucault)"

For a little over a century and a half, professors of literature have been celebrating historical specificity, while chafing against the constraints of continuous narrative. Literary historians' enthusiasm for Michel Foucault's critique of historical continuity is only the latest instance of this long-standing disciplinary preference. Underwood traces the social and institutional authority of discontinuity in literary study back to the first 'period surveys,' and in particular to the pedagogy of F. D. Maurice.

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O'Quinn, "Projection, Patriotism, Surrogation: Handel in Calcutta"

This paper examines the celebrations following the defeat of Tipu Sultan in the Third Mysore War. By attending to both the visual projections and to the performance of Handel's Judas Maccabaeus in Calcutta, it argues that much of entertainment was involved in a complex allegorical struggle with France. This essay appears in _Romanticism and Patriotism: Nation, Empire, Bodies, Rhetoric_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Reading Jane Austen in Wartime

Date published: 

August, 2008

Reading Jane Austen in Wartime

Mary A. Favret, Indiana University-Bloomington


  1. Why teach Jane Austen in wartime? An old commonplace has it that Jane Austen's novels showed little awareness of a world disrupted by revolution and war. There are many versions of this thought, but I will cite only one of the more sophisticated, coming from another wartime novelist, Virginia Woolf: 

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Lussier, "Enlightenment East and West: An Introduction to Romanticism and Buddhism"

Rather than summarizing the essays appearing in this special issue of Romantic Circles Praxis, this introductory essay provides a historical context for the emergence of what is now termed 'Buddhism' into European consciousness during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. This essay appears in _Romanticism and Buddhism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.
February 2007

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