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_Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine_ Review of _Valperga_, March 1823, Feb 18, 1826

March, 1998
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, XIII (March 1823), p. 283-293.
Review of Valperga

Valperga; or the Life and Adventures of Castruccio, Prince of Lucca. By the Author of "Frankenstein." In Three Volumes. London: Printed for G. and W.B. Whittaker, Ave-Maria-Lane. 1823.

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Camden, "Money, Matrimony, and Memory: Secondary Heroines in Radcliffe, Austen, and Cooper"

Camden traces the decline of the cult of sensibility in Gothic, sentimental, and historical romance through the figure of the forgotten heroine. The exclusion of these heroines from the resolution of the novel offers a challenge to generic and nationalistic constraints. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Wordsworth's Route Over the Simplon in 1790

August, 2001
In August 2001, Roger Meyenberg and Patrick Vincent hiked Wordsworth's route over the Simplon Pass, as described in Book VI of The Prelude. Their goal was to establish, of several reconstructed versions of the hike, which route Wordsworth and Robert Jones most likely followed. Includes their narrative and photographs of the pass today.

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"Pleasure is now, and ought to be, your business": Stealing Sexuality in Jane Austen's Juvenilia

Austen's Juvenilia, seen as a whole, represents a world in which young women consistently display excessive appetites--for food, drink, erotic pleasures, and material objects. While comic, such narrative excess also constitutes a pointed critique of the constraints Austen's society placed on women, constraints she not only exposes but also subverts by her young heroines' exuberant, even criminal refusal to deny their appetites and their demand for gratifications of all kinds. This essay appears in _Historicizing Romantic Sexuality_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.
January 2006

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Framing Romantic Dress: Mary Robinson, Princess Caroline and the Sex/Text

Two Romantic Period women who were accustomed to public appearances used the semiotic play provided by deliberate dress choices to create public interpretations of their legible bodies: Mary Robinson and Princess Caroline. While Robinson carefully crafted her public image, she also varied it with fashionable rapidity so that she was always in the public eye due to her literal mobility among public spaces and her identity mobility. This flexible form of role playing allowed Robinson to adjust her public image as necessary. When the less adept Caroline of Brunswick attempted to create similar identity play for herself, the outcome was successful or disastrous in public opinion depending on her political backers. Caroline's body was pre-read through political screens, and unlike Robinson's careful identity managing, Caroline's costuming was directed at fighting or abetting such screens.
January 2006

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Crocco, "The Ruins of Empire: Nationalism, Art, and Empire in Hemans's Modern Greece"

This study discusses the importance of the trope of ruins and the paradigm of decline and fall to the rhetoric of nationalism and imperialism in Felicia Hemans's Modern Greece. Contingent to this subject is an exploration of the ways in which female writers of the Romantic Period were able to enter the public sphere and broach the often male-gendered topoi of nationalism, travel, and empire by adopting differing patriotic stances and unique narratological structures. This essay appears in _Romanticism and Patriotism: Nation, Empire, Bodies, Rhetoric_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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"An assiduous frequenter of the Italian opera": Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound and the opera buffa

By the time he came to add act IV to the original three acts of "Prometheus Unbound" in late 1819, Percy Bysshe Shelley had amassed a diverse set of musical experiences, ranging from the first London performance of Rossini's "Il barbiere di Siviglia" in March of 1818 to the grand festivities or "funzioni" in Rome during Easter week in 1819. While critics and reviewers of the past two hundred years have struggled to find a suitable analogy for "Prometheus Unbound" in literature, it seems possible that Shelley had non-literary models in mind. Indeed, the world of music provides a clear parallel to Shelley's lyrical drama in the form of the Italian "opera buffa" that so delighted the poet and his friends during the London seasons in 1817 and 1818. This essay argues that the organization of discourse and the specific dramatic arrangement of Shelley's "Prometheus Unbound" have strong affinities with the Italian operas of his day, particularly the works of Mozart and Rossini.
May 2005

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Sounds Romantic: The Castrato and English Poetics Around 1800

In contrast to the notion that Italian opera has no relation to romantic opera or to romanticism generally, this essay demonstrates that the Italian castrato was a prominent figure in London during the period around 1800. The essay argues that the idea of the romantic castrato makes it possible to revise understandings of the (aggressive) relationship between sight and sound that is so often attributed to literary production of this period, particularly to William Wordsworth. The essay explores the ways that the castrati-c imagination (ironically) facilitates an analysis of romantic sound imagery that is mindful of materiality, offering in particular a reading of the relation between castrati, sound imagery, and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.
May 2005

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