Scotland

OpenCalais Metadata: Latitude: 

56.4396121212

OpenCalais Metadata: Longitude: 

-4.05319393939

William Gifford to Edward Copleston (12/8/1809) - Correspondence Archive

February, 2005

Section: 

William Gifford to Edward Copleston (12/7/1811) - Correspondence Archive

February, 2005

Section: 

About this volume

Romantic Frictions

About this volume


Newman, "Introduction: A History of Transatlantic Romanticism"

Newman argues that Romanticism was a definitively international cultural movement, and that most literary scholarship examining the period has been deformed by rigid disciplinary boundaries that follow national borders. While early scholars of Transatlantic Romanticism either overemphasized literary nationalism or attempted to argue it out of existence, a third wave, including Richard Gravil and Paul Giles, has emerged that sets a new standard for empirical cultural analysis, freed of nationalist distortions but closely attentive to the power of nationalism as one of the most fundamental structures of identity during the Romantic century. The essays in Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic show that Romanticism was a complex and multivalent response to the combined and uneven rise of capitalist social relations around the Atlantic Rim. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

Tags: 

Resource (Taxonomy): 

Harshbarger, "National Demons: Robert Burns, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and the Folk in the Forest"

A comparison of Nathaniel Hawthorne's 'Young Goodman Brown' and Robert Burns' 'Tam OShanter' sheds light on the critical strategies the authors developed in adapting folk materials in a milieu awash with literary nationalism. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

Tags: 

Resource (Taxonomy): 

Crane, "Love and Merit in the Maritime Historical Novel: Cooper and Scott"

This essay compares the relationships among sailors in Walter Scott’s novel The Pirate (1821) to the instances of intimate friendship among heroes in The Pilot: A Tale of the Sea (1823) by James Fenimore Cooper, who responds to Scott’s conflation of piracy and democracy by portraying meritocracy as a product of democratic social relations. By placing the feelings of the dashing sailor in the context of eighteenth-century political ideas about gender and friendship, the essay uncovers the relationship between manliness and the politics of feeling in two popular narratives of seafaring in the 1820s. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

Tags: 

Resource (Taxonomy): 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Scotland