Scotland

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56.4396121212

OpenCalais Metadata: Longitude: 

-4.05319393939

Potkay, "Captivation and Liberty in Wordsworth's Poems on Music"

This essay addresses the Orphic power of music to seduce and distract--to wring the will of its freedom--in a way that is not incompatible with civic liberty. I focus on two poems from Wordsworth's '1807 Poems, in Two Volumes': the entrancing 'Solitary Reaper' and the poem in which Wordsworth directly addresses the allurements of sound, 'The Power of Music.'

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Hale, "'[S]hak[ing] the dwellings of the great': Liberation in Joanna Baillie's Poems (1790)"

Hale examines Baillie's anonymously published collection Poems (1790) in the context of the British reaction to the French Revolution, Baillie's political ideology as expressed in her letters, and the poetic climate of the second half of the eighteenth century. Through a close reading of the poems he argues that even though some of the poems depict some ambivalence about the eighteenth-century class system, the early Baillie ultimately critiques that system and subtly encourages rural workers to resist its stifling roles. Hale recovers Baillie as a valuable romantic poet and invites scholars to consider her poetry as they flesh out her status as an important dramatist and literary theorist.

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Lincoln, "Walter Scott, Politeness, and Patriotism" - Romanticism and Patriotism: Nation, Empire, Bodies, Rhetoric

This essay argues that within Scott’s fictions the emergence of politeness is grounded in a history of social division and exclusion: the withdrawal of the higher classes from a common culture involved changes in the use of space, and changes in the acceptable norms of bodily behaviour. Following the example of Swift (seen as a great Irish patriot who strove to unite his nation by writing in “every varied form”) Scott’s own patriotic mission an attempt to compensate for, and counteract, the divisive social consequences of modernisation, not only at the level of ideological difference (by enacting moderation) but also at the level of feeling: the recoil from the ‘vulgar’ is transformed into a movement to re-establish relations on manageable terms. This essay appears in _Volume Title_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Scott Repatriated?: La Dame blanche Crosses the Channel

Scotland, close enough to visit, far enough to seem untamed and mysterious, enthralled nineteenth-century composers. Fascination fixated on Sir Walter Scott, whose works spawned numerous foreign operas. When these musical mutations migrated across the channel, however, they often collided with Britain's vision of her 'national' author. This is especially true with Boieldieu's La Dame blanche (1825). The opera succeeded in continental Europe, but two separate London productions failed. What stymied this metamorphosis? As I argue, the conflict between Londoners' nationalistic possessiveness of Scott and Scottish melodies on the one hand, yet their uneasiness with the novels on which the opera was based and its complex score on the other, placed these adaptations at a kind of cultural impasse. Ultimately, the layers of meaning Scott's works had accrued in England made the White Lady one citizen the English could not repatriate.
May 2005

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