United States

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40.4230003233

OpenCalais Metadata: Longitude: 

-98.7372244786

Lee, "'An Anti-Democratic Habit of Feeling': Nationalism and the Rhetoric of Toryism in O'Sullivan's Democratic Review"

By shifting the issue of American nationalism from writers and anxieties of aesthetic independence to anxieties about readers and ideological dependency, I hope to show how the Democratic Review introduced a particular brand of democratic personality and aesthetics which was reinforced by the literature printed in its pages. A material study of creative works in the Democratic Review alongside the writings of its editor O’Sullivan reveals a nationalist strategy that focused on combating British literary power over Americans. This essay explores O’Sullivan’s vital contribution to Jacksonian nationalism through the assembly of authors like Hawthorne and a politicized literary charge that imagined Britain as the moral and sympathetic antithesis to the United States. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Newman, "Introduction: A History of Transatlantic Romanticism"

Newman argues that Romanticism was a definitively international cultural movement, and that most literary scholarship examining the period has been deformed by rigid disciplinary boundaries that follow national borders. While early scholars of Transatlantic Romanticism either overemphasized literary nationalism or attempted to argue it out of existence, a third wave, including Richard Gravil and Paul Giles, has emerged that sets a new standard for empirical cultural analysis, freed of nationalist distortions but closely attentive to the power of nationalism as one of the most fundamental structures of identity during the Romantic century. The essays in Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic show that Romanticism was a complex and multivalent response to the combined and uneven rise of capitalist social relations around the Atlantic Rim. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Crane, "Love and Merit in the Maritime Historical Novel: Cooper and Scott"

This essay compares the relationships among sailors in Walter Scott’s novel The Pirate (1821) to the instances of intimate friendship among heroes in The Pilot: A Tale of the Sea (1823) by James Fenimore Cooper, who responds to Scott’s conflation of piracy and democracy by portraying meritocracy as a product of democratic social relations. By placing the feelings of the dashing sailor in the context of eighteenth-century political ideas about gender and friendship, the essay uncovers the relationship between manliness and the politics of feeling in two popular narratives of seafaring in the 1820s. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Almeida, "London-Kingston-Caracas: The Transatlantic Self-Fashioning of Simón Bolívar"

This article argues that transatlantic readings of Romanticism must go beyond the limits imposed by a monolingual, Anglophone definition of the transatlantic. An analysis of the bilingual presentation of Simón Bolívar's persona and writings for a London public in publications such as the Jamaica Gazette, Variedades, and the New Monthly Magazine shows how this amplified notion of the transatlantic helps us better understand Britain's political and literary interests in the Americas. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Johnson, "Contingencies, Exigencies, and Editorial Praxis: The Case of the 2008 Norton Blake"

In updating the Norton Critical Edition of _Blake's Poetry and Designs_ (1979; 2008) to include the entire textual portion of _Jerusalem_, editors Mary Lynn Johnson and John E. Grant attempted to continue engaging and informing first-time readers of Blake within the constraints of the publisher's current editorial and fiscal policies. This anecdotal case history considers the influence of unforeseen contingencies and exigencies in book production upon high-minded editorial praxis. This essay appears in _Editing and Reading Blake_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Jager, "Introduction"

In this introduction to the volume, Jager argues that secularism has remained an obscure topic within romantic studies. Noting that 'a genealogy of romantic secularism has yet to be written,' Jager sketches some aspects of such a genealogy by noting the persistence of romantic thinking—about the symbol, for example—in secular thinking. Cosmopolitanism, he notes, has been more widely considered alongside romanticism, but here again the relationship of secularism to 'romantic cosmopolitanism' has tended to remain invisible. Is cosmopolitanism part of a secular project? Or do the conditions of postmodernity in fact make possible a religious cosmopolitanism of a kind anticipated by some romantic texts? This essay appears in _Secularism, Cosmopolitanism, and Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Jager, "Byron and Romantic Occidentalism"

Jager argues that occidentalism (a critique of the west) can be found alongside Byron's obvious orientalism. That occidentalism, moreover, finds a use for enchantment that goes beyond secular critiques of the concept. This essay appears in _Secularism, Cosmopolitanism, and Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Canuel, "Romantic Fear"

Reading the works of figures ranging from Bentham and Coleridge to present-day incarnations of the Gothic novel, this essay argues that the 'secular' emerged in Romantic literature less as a distinct form of belief and more as a new organization of beliefs. It claims that the crucial development for achieving that organization was the reconfiguration of penal laws, which in turn demanded a new articulation of fear among political subjects. This essay appears in _Romanticism, Secularism, and Cosmopolitanism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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LeFavour, "Acting 'Natural': Vanity Fair and the Unmasking of Anglo-American Sentiment"

Taking Vanity Fair's popular success in the United States as one of many signals that an enclosed body of American 'domestic fiction' is untenable, LeFavour takes Thackeray's mockery of the genre as a signal to reconsider the naivite of American readers and the American fiction they read. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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