Literature

The Monthly Review, April 1818

April, 1818

The Monthly Review, N.S., 85 (April 1818): 439.

An uncouth story, in the taste of the German novelists, trenching in some degree on delicacy, setting probability at defiance, and leading to no conclusion either moral or philosophical. In some passages, the writer appears to favour the doctrines of materialism: but a serious examination is scarcely necessary for so excentric a vagary of the imagination as this tale presents

Tags: 

Shelley’s Spasmodic Afterlife

Shelley's political legacy passed through an often-neglected school of writers to world leaders and revolutionaries globally in the decades following his death. When assessing his legacy, we should not overlook those early, ardent appreciators known as "the Spasmodic School." Alexander Smith, Sydney Dobell, J. Stanyan Bigg, and even James Thomson B.V. took Shelley's call to a revolution conducted through imaginative sympathy seriously, and together, helped to fan his "fading coal" to flame.

September 2015

Tags: 

Masks of An-Archy: Shelley, Rancière, and the Anarchist Turn

This essay reads Percy Bysshe Shelley's The Mask of Anarchy in the context of the resurgence of critical interest in anarchist theory. The essay meditates on how recent developments in anarchist-related critical theory, specifically the work of Jacques Rancière, make visible an aesthetics of anarchism. Using Rancière's re-contextualization of the Romantic aesthetic philosophies of Immanuel Kant and Friedrich Schiller, the essay argues that Shelley's protest poem can be read as an anarchism not only in terms of its political content, but, perhaps more radically, with respect to its form. In so doing, the essay attempts to think beyond the critical impasse in which The Mask is understood as sacrificing aesthetics for politics, or politics for aesthetics, by asking how The Mask might be read as expressing an anarchic politics, in Rancière's words, "simply by being literature."

September 2015

Tags: 

Remembering John Cahuac: Post-Peterloo Repression and the Fate of Radical-Romantic Satire

In the short run, government prosecution of radical publishers after Peterloo affected literary sensibilities of late Romanticism, evident in the fall in popularity of political satire in the 1820s. In the long run, government repression, by silencing dissent, shaped the canon of radical and Romantic literature. This essay explores the forgotten career of the radical satirist and publisher, John Cahuac, cut short by his transportation.

September 2015

Tags: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Literature