Literature

Felicia Bonaparte - The Poetics of Poesis: The Making of Nineteenth-Century English Fiction. Reviewed by James Lello

Bonaparte, Felicia, The Poetics of Poesis: The Making of Nineteenth-Century English Fiction (University of Virginia Press, 2015). 336 pp. (Hdbk., $49.50; ISBN 9780813937328)

James Lello

St Catharine’s College, Cambridge

What is meant by the conspicuous proximity of the twin desiderata announced in the title of the book under review: “Poetics” and “Poesis”? How might they relate to nineteenth-century English fiction?

Roger Paulin - The Life of August Wilhelm Schlegel: Cosmopolitan of Art and Poetry. Reviewed by Nicholas Halmi

Paulin, Roger, The Life of August Wilhelm Schlegel: Cosmopolitan of Art and Poetry (Cambridge: Open Book Publishers, 2016), 662 pp. (Pbk. £29.95; ISBN 978-1-909254-95-4; PDF version free at www.openbookpublishers.com//download/book/452)

Nicholas Halmi

University of Oxford

Regina Akel - Benjamin Disraeli and John Murray: The Politician, the Publisher, and the Representative. Reviewed by Robert O'Kell

Akel, Emily, Benjamin Disraeli and John Murray: The Politician, the Publisher, and the Representative (Liverpool University Press, 2016). xiv + 206 pp. (Hdbk., £85.00).

Robert O’Kell

University of Manitoba

Teaching Romanticism with the Contemporary

Date published: 

April, 2017

This special issue explores the notion that many of the forms, ideas, and practices inaugurated or exemplified in the Romantic period continue to shape and drive our contemporary discourses. Literary critics, cultural and political theorists, and, indeed, our students continue to encounter new permutations—if not the continued presence—of something that might be called the romantic. But how is the (neo-)romantic expressed in contemporary culture? And how might we best prepare students to listen for and hear its repetitions? How might we teach the romantic alongside the contemporary without either reducing one to the other or eliding important historical, cultural, and social contexts? In response to these questions, the nine essays and three interviews that comprise this volume address the repetitions and reverberations of the romantic as it recurs across genre, period, and media boundaries in popular culture, contemporary political situations, changing classroom dynamics, and the constantly shifting domains of literary and pedagogical practice and production.

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“Vulnerability and Ambition in Romantic, Modern, and Contemporary Poetry,” a recorded interview with Brian McGrath (Walt Hunter)

In this recorded interview, Brian McGrath and Walt Hunter, colleagues and romantic and contemporary poetry scholars respectively, discuss the usefulness of teaching contemporary poetry in the romanticism classroom, and vice versa.

Pedagogy of the Depressed: Romanticism and the Long Revolution

This essay discusses how a course about 'literature and revolution' invites students to make use of depression as an affective explanation for the history of optimism, disappointment, reluctant transformation, and fear of the future. Students assess their relationship to the ongoing past in which modernity, mobility, self-making, and optimism were first offered as political goals for entire societies, and consider how a 'long revolution' shapes their relationship to the disappointing present, in the literature classroom as a locus, instrument, and effect of radical social transformation.

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