Literature

Romantic Education: Romantic Pedagogies and New Approaches to Teaching Romanticism

Date published: 

May, 2016
These essays offer diverse ways of thinking about the intersections of Romanticism and pedagogy: both what Romantic-era figures themselves thought about the processes of learning and teaching and also what we as modern educators might consider as we present these texts and figures to our students. It is our hope that they will contribute to ongoing conversations among scholars and teachers of Romanticism about the history and future of humanities education, and in particular will foster cross-historical conversations.

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Romanticism and the Sciences by Robert Mitchell

Robert Mitchell collects and discusses eight wide-ranging approaches to the subject of Romanticism and the Sciences:

  1. Hannah Arendt, The Human Condition (Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1998)
  2. Alan Bewell, Wordsworth and the Enlightenment: Nature, Man, and Society in the Experimental Poetry (New Haven, Yale University Press, 1989)
  3. Georges Canguilhem, “The Living and its Milieu,” Grey Room 3 (2001): 7-31
  4. Michel Foucault, Security, Territory, Population: Lectures at the College de France, 1977-78, trans. G. Burchell; ed. M. Senellart (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007)
  5. Denise Gigante, “The Monster in the Rainbow: Keats and the Science of Life," PMLA 117 (2002): 433–448
  6. Friedrich Kittler, Discourse Networks 1800/1900 (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1990)
  7. Phillip Mirowksi, More Heat than Light: Economics as Social Physics; Physics as Nature's Economics (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989)
  8. Steven Shapin and Simon Schaffer, Leviathan and the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1985)

      About this Volume

      Date published: 

      May, 2016

      About this Volume

      The Romantic era witnessed broad experimentation with and theorization of education at all levels, from efforts to make education available to child laborers to ideas about the role of nature in learning. Our own period is experiencing similarly intense debates about the best means of educating students in

      Universal Truths, Unacknowledged Legislators: Teaching the First Sentence of Pride and Prejudice

      Date published: 

      May, 2016

      The following essay replays a close-reading, word-by-word in-class exercise of Pride and Prejudice's opening sentence: "It is a truth universally acknowledged that single men in possession of good fortunate must be in want of a wife." In our close reading students and I explore how, in Austen's hands, her famed use of free indirect discourse and irony deflate transcendental assumptions about gender and class. With this deflationary gesture, Austen’s turning of these tropes allows us to see, in turn, how her work connects to the biopolitical imperative to extend the lifespan of the human species that Foucault sees emerging in the eighteenth century. On our reading, though, irony, as developed by Austen, provides a powerful tool for questioning such an imperative in our own time of planetary peril.

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      “Hints & Speculation on Education”: Tom Wedgwood’s Materialist Pedagogy

      Date published: 

      May, 2016

      This article examines the connection between Tom Wedgwood’s pedagogical theories and his materialist theories of mind, which emphasized the importance of emotion in character formation. Wedgwood hoped to open an experimental school for infants with the goal of producing a generation of politically radical geniuses. This article situates Wedgwood’s ideas within the context of Romantic theories of cognition, debates about the mind-body relationship, and social reform, and points to a growing trend that connected bodily health and moral virtue. It argues for the significance of his largely ignored or undervalued contributions to Romantic thinking about the mind, body, and education.

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      Imagining the Internet Through the Romantics

      Date published: 

      May, 2016

      This essay chronicles my experience teaching a course outside of the realm of Romanticism (a first-year writing course focused on digital media), an experience which occasioned reflection on the lessons that Romanticism can offer us about contemporary new media, and in particular how we approach new media pedagogically. The essay begins with an overview of new media scholarship which seeks to redress the tendency to view new media as always immaterial, the scholarship that informed much of the focus of the course in question. I next discuss some of the tools and methods adopted in teaching the course. And the final move in the essay turns toward Romanticism, and specifically to theories of and scholarship on the Romantic imagination. My final contention is that the Romantic imagination offers ways to resist the ideology of immateriality which characterizes so much of new media discourse.

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      Introduction

      Date published: 

      May, 2016
      This collection combines studies of pedagogical history in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century with discourses about innovations taking place in today’s classrooms. By including essays on both topics, we hope to expose the breadth and richness of educational debates in Romanticism, to shed light on new ways to teach Romantic texts, and, finally, to encourage readers to find links between—and potentially answers to—the pedagogical problems facing educators both today and two hundred years ago.

      Revisiting the Radical Republican Publishers of the Romantic Era in the Digital Era

      Date published: 

      May, 2016

      The design of this course is to introduce students to the influence that Digital Humanities is having on our organization of the study of Romanticism. To that end, the course shifts from the traditional survey of major authors, to a survey of Romantic-era publishers, whose publications have only recently become widely available through digitization. While there are opportunities for the close reading of major Romantic texts authored by these publishers, emphasis is placed in the assignments on distant reading of periodicals. Moreover, the course prompts student to reflect on the diverse politics of publication, both in the Romantic era, when independent individuals acquired printing presses and began to advocate for freedom of the press, as well as in the present day, with its diverse concerns over freedom of information, copyrights, privacy, and so on.

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      Generic Mutability and the Pedagogy of Realism in Charlotte Smith’s The Romance of Real Life and Mary Wollstonecraft’s Original Stories from Real Life

      Date published: 

      May, 2016

      This paper investigates the didactic and pedagogic values of Romantic realism by looking at the ways in which Wollstonecraft and Smith, in particular, experiment with the synthesis of Romance and history and how these experiments form the core of their pedagogical projects undertaken within the growing genre of children’s prose. Wollstonecraft’s and Smith’s productions for young readers address the anxiety about women’s ability to employ historical fact and realism in serious literature and replace women’s “state of perpetual childhood” with the powerful roles of educator and arbitrator. But these authors also help create a hybrid genre that allows them to temper history with the attractiveness of Romance and to elevate fiction by infusing it with realism, thus turning fiction into a medium that can address history, society, and all aspects of “real life” as it acts as a powerful pedagogical tool on young minds.

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