Criticism

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Criticism
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Criticism
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Criticism

O'Donnell, "Three or Four Ways of Looking at an Urn"

In the undergraduate classroom the hypercanonized Urn needs first to be de-familiarized and re-presented as a dynamic, self-conflicted, and fruitfully perplexing artifact. Such an approach challenges a view of poetry that seems to be increasingly prevalent, according to which a poem is a more or less elaborate code and reading a process of discovering hidden meaning. Awakening students to a lively appreciation of the surface of a poem and to the possibility that the poem means exactly what (and everything that) it says can be an end in itself (in the introductory course) or can underlie other approaches, more concerned with historical, philosophical, or psychological approaches. This essay appears in _Ode on a Grecian Urn_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Keegan, "Teaching Like an Urn"

Keegan describes how Ode on a Grecian Urn serves as a key text to model for first-year undergraduates how they might begin to readjust their strategies and expectations in analyzing literature. Keats's poem productively stresses the equal importance of questions and questioning when approaching a poem or a work of art. This essay appears in _Ode on a Grecian Urn: Hypercanonicity & Pedagogy_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Kandl, "The Timeless in Its Time: Engaging Students in a Close-reading and Discussion of the Historical Contexts of 'Ode on a Grecian Urn'"

In discussions of hypercanonical works, often presented as "timeless," it is useful for students to grapple with ways in which such a work can be reconstituted within its historical moment. the deeply felt personal expression, public, political statement, or of timeless art transcending and biographical? My goal allow discussion encompassing all these registers simultaneously, and, naturally, Keats's Ode on Grecian Urn presents remarkably rich site explore tensions. This essay appears _Ode Urn: Hypercanonicity & Pedagogy_, volume _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively Romantic (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University Maryland.

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Haney, "Hermeneutics for Sophomores"

Grounding his reading in the hermeneutic tradition, Haney argues that Keat's Ode on a Grecian Urn can be productively taught to non-English majors as an exploration of the interpretive processes at work in the poem itself and in our historically mediated relationship to the poem. Such an approach runs counter to narrowly ideological readings while still emphasizing the historicity of interpretation. This essay appears in _Ode on a Grecian Urn: Hypercanonicity & Pedagogy_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Elam, "Remembering to Die"

The poem tempts us to read the art object (urn as well as poem) as an expression of transcendence. This essay suggests the opposite: that the poem reminds us that art for Keats is not transcendence of mortality but a distillation of its forces. This essay appears in _Ode on a Grecian Urn: Hypercanonicity & Pedagogy_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Hall, "Keats's Widely-Taught and Well-Wrought 'Urn'"

Hall notes the place of Keat's Urn in a variety of graduate and undergraduate pedagogies but focuses on the poem's usefulness in teaching students how to read. Depending on the kind of class, he emphasizes formalist or deconstructionist techniques of close textual analysis and places the poem in the context of second-generation British Romanticism.. This essay appears in _Ode on a Grecian Urn: Hypercanonicity & Pedagogy_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Collings, "Suspended Satisfaction: 'Ode on a Grecian Urn' and the Construction of Art"

In Ode on a Grecian Urn, Keats depicts the urn as the impossible, absent object perpetually invoked, and missed, in consumerist desire. The urn thus becomes an aesthetic artifact, a product of that gesture whereby the museum severs its objects from historical reference and places them in a zone of atemporal, eternal significance. Rather than teaching an eternal truth, the urn returns to viewers the eternity they attribute to it, and as a result, becomes an exemplary statement of the ideology of the museum. This essay appears in _Hypercanonicity & Pedagogy_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Wilner, "Economies of Excess in Brillat-Savarin, Balzac, and Baudelaire"

The article examine the relationship between Baudelaire's early essay, 'On Wine and Hashish Compared as Means for the Multiplication of Individuality' and Brillat-Savarin's _Physiology of Taste_, and the role of Balzac's 'Treatise on Modern Stimulants' in mediating this relationship. I argue that Brillat Savarin's 'transcendental gastronomy' is a theory and practice of excess consumption, notwithstanding its denunciations of excess, and that Baudelaire's writing functions as a hyperbolic exposure of this underlying tendency. This essay appears in _Romantic Gastronomies_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Romantic Gastronomies

This volume suggests the myriad ways in which the surprisingly neglected (and critically undigested) Romantic culture of gastronomy influenced artistic production of nineteenth-century Britain and France-at the same time as it raised new philosophical challenges. Edited and introduction by Denise Gigante, this volume includes essays by Carolyn Korsmeyer, Joshua Wilner, and Michael Garval.

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January, 2007

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Korsemeyer, "Tastes and Pleasures"

Despite the prominence of the metaphor of taste in the development of aesthetics, philosophers routinely exclude literal taste from aesthetic theory. This essay investigates the concepts of gustatory and aesthetic pleasure, looking especially at Brillat-Savarin's Physiology of Taste, to interrogate the commonalities and differences between the two sorts of taste. This essay appears in _Romantic Gastronomies_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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