Criticism

Synonyms: 

g7
Criticism
g7
Criticism
g7
g7
Criticism

Chaosmic Orders: Nonclassical Physics, Allegory, and the Epistemology of Blake’s Minute Particulars

The essay considers Blake's epistemology of "minute particulars" in terms of what the essay defines as "radical organization," the concept in part indebted to the epistemology of quantum mechanics, further linked to the epistemology of allegory in de Man's sense. By so doing, the essay positions Blake's epistemology in relation to both quantum physics and chaos theory. While both depart epistemologically from classical, Newtonian, physics, they are epistemologically different in turn. This difference helps to illuminate the complexities of Blake's epistemology, which, and the way it departs from Newton, have affinities with both of these theories, but does not fully conforms to either. The essay also relates this epistemological problematic to the view of Blake's illuminated manuscripts as (or at least as anticipating) the artists' books-the art form that combines the self-conscious investigation of the conceptual and material form of the book with the interplay of the literary and the visual within it.
March 2001

Resource (Taxonomy): 

Romanticism and Complexity

An investigation into the scientific thought of Romantic writers, looking at the Romantics' conflicted attitudes toward Enlightenment-based science, and offering speculative explorations of their work in the framework of more recent scientific developments. Edited by Hugh Roberts, essays by Arkady Plotnitsky and R. Paul Yoder.

Date published: 

March, 2001

Tags: 

Table of Contents - _Romantic Commonplaces: An Interview with Jerome Christensen_ Romantic Circle Praxis Series - Romantic Circles

Finding Romantic Commonplaces: An Interview with Jerome Christensen

Site Four: Romantic Populism and Insurgent Civil Society

This is a hyperlinked dialogue between Steve Newman and Professor Jerome Christensen, author of groundbreaking works on Romanticism. The discussion is built on four sites: 1) Professor Christensen's Romantic education during the rise of Continental theory in the American academy; 2) His critique of the prescriptions posited by new historicism in contrast to Romanticism's ethical imperative to converse; 3) The notion of a Romantic pedagogy in light of his work in digital media and its configurations of consumption as "addiction"; and 4) The place of our teaching and research in relationship to an increasing corporate academy and the cultures of the street.
June 2002

Resource (Taxonomy): 

Site Three: Use, Pedagogy, and Addiction

This is a hyperlinked dialogue between Steve Newman and Professor Jerome Christensen, author of groundbreaking works on Romanticism. The discussion is built on four sites: 1) Professor Christensen's Romantic education during the rise of Continental theory in the American academy; 2) His critique of the prescriptions posited by new historicism in contrast to Romanticism's ethical imperative to converse; 3) The notion of a Romantic pedagogy in light of his work in digital media and its configurations of consumption as "addiction"; and 4) The place of our teaching and research in relationship to an increasing corporate academy and the cultures of the street.
June 2002

Resource (Taxonomy): 

Site Two: Salisbury Plain, Sympathy, and Historicism

This is a hyperlinked dialogue between Steve Newman and Professor Jerome Christensen, author of groundbreaking works on Romanticism. The discussion is built on four sites: 1) Professor Christensen's Romantic education during the rise of Continental theory in the American academy; 2) His critique of the prescriptions posited by new historicism in contrast to Romanticism's ethical imperative to converse; 3) The notion of a Romantic pedagogy in light of his work in digital media and its configurations of consumption as "addiction"; and 4) The place of our teaching and research in relationship to an increasing corporate academy and the cultures of the street.
June 2002

Resource (Taxonomy): 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Criticism