Arkansas

OpenCalais Metadata: Latitude: 

34.8

OpenCalais Metadata: Longitude: 

-92.2

NASSR '96

November, 1996

NASSR Annual Convention, 1996

Note: The formatting of the following program follows the original. We have made only minor changes throughout, correcting obvious errors and making some listings more uniform to facilitate electronic searching.

ROMANTIC CROSSINGS

November 14-16, Boston area (Sheraton Tara, Newton)

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NASSR '94

NASSR Annual Conventions, 1993-1999

Note: The formatting of the following program follows the original. We have made only minor changes throughout, correcting obvious errors and making some listings more uniform to facilitate electronic searching.




The Political and Aesthetic Education of Romanticism

2nd Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism

10-13 November 1994

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Ferguson-Wagstaffe, "'Points of Contact': Blake and Whitman"

This essay seeks to reopen a transatlantic dialogue between Blake and Whitman, and illuminate a material point of contact (Whitman’s tomb)through a close reading of these poets’ rhetorical points of contact. The author focuses on Blake's engraving, 'Death's Door,' which served as a model for Whitman's tomb, Whitman’s responses to Blake in his letters and notes, their shared status as prophetic poets, and their poetics of revision. This essay appears in _Sullen Fires Across the Atlantic: Essays in Transatlantic Romanticism_, a volume of _Romantic Circles Praxis Series_, prepared exclusively for Romantic Circles (http://www.rc.umd.edu/), University of Maryland.

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Unlocking Language: Self-Similarity in Blake’s Jerusalem

In the first part of the essay, Yoder outlines John Locke's theory of language as it is presented in Book III of the Essay concerning Human Understanding. Locke identifies the flaws in language as obscurity and instability, and he offers a five-point plan to repair these flaws primarily by eliminating figurative language and limiting the meaning of words to what they have meant in the past. In the second part of the essay, focusing primarily on William Blake's Jerusalem, Yoder argues that Blake offers a theory of language contrary to Locke's theory, one in which language might be described as fractal, a term borrowed from chaos theory. In Blake's system, signfication expands and contracts across a sliding scale of analogous linguistic structures; the standard of these fractal iterations is the human form. Yoder also argues that this understanding of language helps to explain the problem of narrative in Blake's poem.
March 2001

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