Georgia

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123456.0

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123456.0

NASSR '96

November, 1996

NASSR Annual Convention, 1996

Note: The formatting of the following program follows the original. We have made only minor changes throughout, correcting obvious errors and making some listings more uniform to facilitate electronic searching.

ROMANTIC CROSSINGS

November 14-16, Boston area (Sheraton Tara, Newton)

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NASSR '94

NASSR Annual Conventions, 1993-1999

Note: The formatting of the following program follows the original. We have made only minor changes throughout, correcting obvious errors and making some listings more uniform to facilitate electronic searching.




The Political and Aesthetic Education of Romanticism

2nd Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism

10-13 November 1994

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"Mummy, possest": Sadism and Sensibility in Shelley's Frankenstein

Frankenstein's dream after "giving birth" suggests that the creature represents the unspeakable body of the mother within the Symbolic Order. Shelley's representation of female characters implies that sadism and sensibility are complementary responses to the paradoxical views of motherhood within patriarchy. The novel is a hybrid of male and female Gothic narrative conventions: Frankenstein's story follows the male Gothic trajectory of the overreacher who fails and dies. Embedded in this story is the creature's Bildungsroman, tragically diverted from the comic female plot. Shelley does represent her own mother; her complex frame narrative contains, at five removes from the outer frame (Walton's letters), the story of a woman very like Mary Wollstonecraft. Subsequent versions of the Frankenstein myth in popular culture tend to repress the female (as Victor refuses to create a bride for this creature); she may appear, however, in the proliferation of horror movies about mummies.
July 2003

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Lewis/Gounod's Bleeding Nonne: An Introduction and Translation of the Scribe/Delavigne Libretto

Librettists Scribe and Delavigne transformed M.G. Lewis's Gothic episode in The Monk into a tale conforming to the conventions of mid-nineteenth-century French "grand opera." Charles Gounod's setting of this libretto closed after eleven performances in the autumn of 1854 and has never been revived. The production was beset with problems arising from opera-house and prima-donna politics, but its failure may also imply crucial cultural transformations in Europe since the revolutionary 1790's when Lewis had published his novel. A translation of the libretto gives Anglo-American scholars ready access to this paradoxical opera in the Gothic tradition.
May 2005

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Golgonooza Text

Exemplifing an interpretation of Blake's invented name "Golgonooza" as from the Greek 'logon zooa,' or "living word," "animated text," this piece demonstrates several ways that, by means of digital processing, Blake's work might be made more physically dynamic. Macromedia's Flash program is used to create dissolves through an aligned sequence of different copies of the same plate ("The Voice of the Ancient Bard"), so that the text and image are at once the same in outline but continually "glowing with varying colours immortal, heart-piercing / And lovely" (Milton, pl. 11, ll. 32-33). A format for simultaneous presentation of the differently sequenced 'unique copies' of The Book of Urizen is suggested, as is an interactive format for The Four Zoas. The piece includes some incidental reflections on the curiosity of public-domain text and copyright image, the organization of the Blake Archive, and the need for the ability to deep-link to its resources.
January 2005

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Living Inside the Poem: MOOs and Blake's Milton

Blake designed his work to do more than sit on a page. The performative quality of Milton is examined and then enacted in a digital environment. The MOO provides an interactive space for re-creating Blake's space and relationship among characters. The digital project serves as a heuristic for reading the transformative quality of Blake's visions. Ultimately, the reader is not able to maintain an "objective" distance from the visionary work.
January 2005

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