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North American Society for the Study of Romanticism 1993 Conference Program

Romantic Circles

NASSR Annual Conventions, 1993-

Note: The formatting of the following program follows the original. We have made only minor changes throughout, correcting obvious errors and making some listings more uniform to facilitate electronic searching.




Romanticism and the Ideologies of Genre

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Archive of Romantic Division Sessions at Modern Language Association Annual Conventions (1990- )

Romantic Studies at the MLA, 1990-
English Romantic Period Division Sessions

1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998

1990

Romantic Elegy: The Elegiac Mode in Romantic Verse I

Division on the English Romantic Period. Presiding: Stephen M. Parrish, Cornell Univ.

1. "Elegy into Aura," Carol L. Bernstein, Bryn Mawr Coll.
2. "Rewriting Pastoral Elegy: Wordsworth's The Brothers," Bruce Edward Graver, Providence Coll.
3. "'Where Once . . . We Stood Rejoicing': Wordsworth, Scott, and Musings near Aquapendente," Stephen Gill, Oxford Univ.

Romantic Elegy: The Elegiac Mode in Romantic Verse II

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American Conference on Romanticism 1997 Conference Program

American Conference on Romanticism Annual Meetings, 1994-1998

Note: The formatting of the following program follows the original. We have made only minor changes throughout, correcting obvious errors and making some listings more uniform to facilitate electronic searching.




American Conference on Romanticism Fourth Annual Meeting

University of Georgia, January 22-25, 1998

Conference Organizer: Anne Williams



Registration, Holiday Inn Lobby: 2:30-5:30

First Session: 3:30-5:00

1. Gothic/Romantic I, Athena I :

Chair: Anne Williams, University of Georgia

b. "The Tigers in the Woods: Gothicism and Wordsworth's Lucy Poems"
Laura Dabundo, Kennesaw State University

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American Conference on Romanticism 1996 Conference Program

Romantic Circles

Section: 

American Conference on Romanticism 1995 Conference Program

American Conference on Romanticism
Annual Meetings, 1994-1998

Note: The formatting of the following program follows the original. We have made only minor changes throughout, correcting obvious errors and making some listings more uniform to facilitate electronic searching.





2nd Annual Meeting

Section: 

American Conference on Romanticism 1994 Conference Program

American Conference on Romanticism
Annual Meetings, 1994-1998

Note: The formatting of the following program follows the original. We have made only minor changes throughout, correcting obvious errors and making some listings more uniform to facilitate electronic searching.





American Conference on Romanticism

1st Annual Meeting

The Pennsylvania State University
University Park, Pennsylvania

October 14-16, 1994

The Penn State Scanticon Conference Center Hotel


Conference Organizer:

Ray Fleming,
Pennsylvania State University

Section: 

Kennedy, "Going Viral: Stedman's Narrative, textual variation, and life in Atlantic Studies"

The current multiplex configuration of Stedman's _Narrative_ emerged in 1988, the result of Richard and Sally Price's new scholarly edition. The Prices' text transcribed Stedman's 1790 manuscript version aiming to restore his original authorial intent and exposing the extent to which the text had been altered by Stedman's first editor, Joseph Johnson. Both versions of the _Narrative_ are troubled by what they cannot contain, whether it be the sexual exploitation made possible by plantation-slavery, or the inter-racial desire that would eventually mark Stedman's _Narrative_ as a singular example of resistance to the exploitations inherent in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world.
October 2011

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Raley, "A Teleology of Letters; or, From a "Common Source" to a Common Language"

Like Sir William Jones, the Orientalist John Borthwick Gilchrist, one-time professor at the College of Fort William and seminary instructor, composed an orthoepigraphical system for the transcription of South Asian languages into the Roman alphabet. Gilchrist's project, though, was inherently instrumental, and it effected a partial shift in philological emphasis away from the decoding of the scholarly and classical languages to the demotic and vernacular; his campaign was to insure colloquial proficiency in Hindustani, generally considered the popular language of the East, so that those bound for India could have the proper foundation with which to converse with the natives, to acquire local knowledge, and to come to know Oriental literature. The connection between common languages and governmental control partly accounts for Gilchrist's extensive valorization of functional rationality, as does the idea that language ultimately cannot awe, mystify, enthrall, or govern if it is not common. Gilchrist, however, did not discount the value of the learned languages; rather he transported this value to the vernacular by articulating a teleological model of philological work that was to progress toward a suturing of the utile and the dulce within a particular 'common' language. English came to be situated in these terms at the intersection of these two paradigms of scholarly activity, at the divide between Jones and Gilchrist, liberal and useful knowledge, and universal and national literacy. In his search for a "remedy" for the Oriental languages and a "new universal grammaclature" to be spoken "by all nations in every age and clime," Gilchrist ultimately directed his efforts toward the introduction of what he called "sterling english" and prophetically calculated the imperial spread of a common, basic, or vernacular, English dialect. Coming at a historical juncture in which the claims for the practical, utilitarian, and scientific uses of language were on the rise, Gilchrist's alignment of scholastic philological work with the vernacular strengthened, by extension, the claims to legitimacy on the part of all vernaculars; and it most particularly paved the way for the legitimation of English. Gilchrist and the author of the coterminous philosophical text Enclytica (1814) contributed strongly to an emergent theory of the vernacular, particularly in their suggestions that vernaculars are tied to industrial and scientific development, that they function as the languages of contemporary record and of history, that they contribute to nation formation, and that the systemic code underlying all languages, the universal grammar, is marked by a profound simplicity.
November 2000

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