Washington

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47.5

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-120.5

British Association for Romantic Studies 1995 Conference Program

Section: 

Program for Boston University Production

Obi: A Play in the Life of Ira Aldridge
The "Paul Robeson" of the 19th Century


July 18, 2000

7:30 p.m., Playwrights Theater, Boston University
Funded by the Humanities Foundation

Romantic Circles




British Association for Romantic Studies

Fourth International Conference

"Placing and Displacing Romanticism"

15-18 July 1995

Section: 

NASSR '94

NASSR Annual Conventions, 1993-1999

Note: The formatting of the following program follows the original. We have made only minor changes throughout, correcting obvious errors and making some listings more uniform to facilitate electronic searching.




The Political and Aesthetic Education of Romanticism

2nd Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism

10-13 November 1994

Cast

August 2002

Resource (Taxonomy): 

Grave Dirt, Dried Toads, and the Blood of a Black Cat: How Aldridge Worked His Charms

The paper explores the complex ways in which Ira Aldridge, in the role of Jack, brought together the rich cultural symbols of slaves, tigers, sugar and blood. It begins by tracing the play to its source in Benjamin Moseley's Treatise on Sugar. Against Mosely's treatise, where sugar is seen as a cure to the diseases of Western culture, the paper uncovers the debates on slavery where the slave trade, not sugar, is called a disease. Further, by examining the rituals of "obi," especially death and reanimation, the paper investigates how obi actually mocks the experience of slavery. Since the centerpiece of the practice was the charm, or obi bag, the paper pays particular attention to the bag's contents, which had the ability to evoke both the brokenness and the power of the rebel slave experience. The paper claims that Aldridge, by acting in the play, performed the rituals of obi-death and reanimation, brokenness and power, and made obi a cure to the disease of slavery.
August 2002

Resource (Taxonomy): 

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