British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815

An electronic edition of Bennett's collection of 350 poems highlighting the complex attitudes to the wars of the period. Includes Bennett's original introduction & a new bibliography of poems not included in the original edition.

1809.11 - "Additional Verse to 'God Save the King'"

September, 2004

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1809.11
Additional Verse to "God Save the King"
Anon
The Morning Chronicle (October 25, 1809)

Great God, bid Carnage cease,
And universal Peace
    Thy fiat bring;
Let this Jubilee Year[1]
Behold the sword and spear
Changed to the scythe and share,
    And bless our King.

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1809.10 - "The Battle of Talavera"

September, 2004

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1809.10
The Battle of Talavera[1]
William Tucker
The Universal Magazine, XII (September 1809), 224-225

                         A Song.

Britons arise! the voice of glory brings
    Illustrious tidings from Iberia's shore!
The Gauls are fled! the land with triumph rings—
    Their eagles bathe their broken wings in gore

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1808.5 - "The Curieux. A Tribute to Valour"

September, 2004

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1808.5
The Curieux.
A Tribute to Valour

John Mayne [1]
The European Magazine, LIII (March, 1808), p. 217
The Gentleman's Magazine, LXXVIII (April, 1808), p. 343

What mean the colours half-mast high,
    In yonder ship upon the main?
Ah me! a seaman made reply,
    Some hero of renown is slain!

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