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The ecological thought—close reading, an endangered species

Hi everyone.

You may be wondering what I'm going to do with these posts. Well—I decided before I started that I was going to experiment with this new medium by posting some close reading. And that I was going to write things that wouldn't be in any of my forthcoming books or essays.

So this is where you get it...

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The carbon-free medium is the carbon-free message

Hi Everyone,

Click here for an account of a green videoconference I just did for ASLE UK (the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment). Science has just done a piece about it.

It seems so obvious that in the future we will need to reconfigure conferencing so that their dates overlap! That way keynote speakers can be shared by videoconference without wasting carbon.

Polycom is a pretty neat, cheap application on the new pcs that supports excellent videoconferencing (better than Skype).

Advantages: saving money, carbon; getting 1+n lots of feedback for the price of one; no jet lag.

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The ecological thought, part fifth

Synethiaphobia: that's my Greek invention for “phobia of intimacy,” the basic feeling of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. “I fear thee ancient Mariner! / I fear thy skinny hand! (4.224–225). Nothing excites synethiaphobia more than the horrifying vulnerability of Life-in-Death. Coleridge hits the synethiaphobic bullseye in part 3.

Pleasingly, synethiaphobia contains the word ethos, which here implies being-with, ethics at the profoundest level.

The ecological thought is, I claim, anti-synethiaphobic. In Lévinas's language, not “allergic” to the other.

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The ecological thought—mission statement

Hi Everyone.

Very kindly, Ron asked me to post a synopsis of my doings here. Writing it was very helpful.

I'm quite jazzed from having just come out of a theory class where I was teaching Althusser, so you may recognize some things Lacanian in here. But I hope I've made the language fairly obvious.

It was one of those happy classes when you allow yourself to think, hey, this critique thing might just be possible...

If you still want to find out more, go to my blog Ecology without Nature.

Here we go:

The ecological thought—mission statement
Timothy Morton

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The ecological thought, part second

At length did cross an Albatross,
Thorough the fog it came;
As if it had been a Christian soul,
We hailed it in God's name.

(Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, 1.63–66)

Hi again. So here we have the fateful bird, emerging from the ice and fog, from the intense, oppressive atmosphere of sheer existence. Lévinas calls this “the element.” One is immersed in it.

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Romantic Circles Poets on Poets on CBS Weekend Roundup

Two brief clips from Romantic Circles' Poets on Poets series will be included in today's broadcast of the CBS Weekend Roundup radio program, contrasting our recording of "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud" by poet Charles North with the rap version performed by the creation of the tourism board, "MC Nuts," a Lake District Red Squirrel.

The May 4, 2007 show can be accessed at the CBS Weekend Roundup podcast page or can be downloaded directly at:

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Coleridge Portraits online

Portraits of Coleridge Exhibition - 14 October to 31 December 2005

The Friends of Coleridge Website is currently hosting a small virtual exhibition of Coleridge portraits which are on temporary virtual loan by kind permission of the National Portrait Gallery, Dove Cottage, and Jesus College Cambridge.

The interesting feature is an arrangement showing the original 1804 Northcote portrait alongside two other versions of it.

Paul Cheshire
Friends of Coleridge Website

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Steve Jones on NPR

Scott Simon interviewed Romantic Circle's own Steve Jones this morning on NPR about Byron's The Corsair, which made publishing history this week in 1814 by selling out its entire run of 10,000 copies on the first day of publication.

For more about Byron's poem and for a recording of the interview, visit http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4487368.

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Blake Archive: Divine Comedy illustrations

The William Blake Archive is pleased to announce the publication of electronic editions of Blake's water color and engraved illustrations to Dante's Divine Comedy. Along with the illustrations to Edward Young's Night Thoughts, the poetry of Thomas Gray, and John Milton's poems, the Dante series of 102 water colors are among Blake's most important series of illustrations to another poet.

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