Poets on Poets

Poets on Poets: Sadoff reading Blake; Byron MS found

This week, after a short holiday, Romantic Circles' Poets on Poets series publishes Ira Sadoff reading Blake's "London." (Also available via free subscription as a podcast.)

"A librarian at University College London has discovered a previously unknown manuscript version of a poem by Lord Byron during a routine cataloguing session. The 12-line poem was inscribed in the front of a copy of an 1810 edition of The Pleasures of Memory by Samuel Rogers, which had been given to the poet by the author."

Main Blog Categories: 

Poets on Poets: Drucker reading Byron (and podcast)

This week's Poets on Poets MP3 archive features Johanna Drucker reading Byron's "Stanzas to [Augusta]." A reminder: weekly updates are now available as a podcast, via Apple's iTunes, iPodder, or any other "podcatcher" program. (See the instructions on the page.)

Main Blog Categories: 

Poets on Poets: Fanny Howe reading Bronte (and podcast)

This week's Poets on Poets MP3 archive features Fanny Howe reading Bronte's "No Coward Soul is Mine."

Now you can subscribe to Poets on Poets as a podcast. Just look for the "RSS Podcast" button on the home page and copy the link into your podcast aggregator or player (such as iTunes) in order to receive automated updates with new postings every week.

Main Blog Categories: 

Poets on Poets: Halsey Reading Beddoes

This week, Poets on Poets MP3 archive presents more Beddoes: Alan Halsey reading "Song in the Air." Halsey's edition of the later text of Beddoes's Death's Jest-Book was published by West House Books in 2003, and his several essays on Beddoes's life and work have appeared in various journals and pamphlets.

Here's the poem:

Main Blog Categories: 

Poets on Poets: Monk reading Beddoes

This week, Romantic Circles' Poets on Poets MP3 Archive features Geraldine Monk--whose work has appeared in numerous major anthologies including the Oxford Anthology of 20th Century British & Irish Poetry--reading two selections from Thomas Lovell Beddoes: "If thou wilt ease thine heart" and "We do lie beneath the grass."

Main Blog Categories: 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Poets on Poets