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The Letters of Robert Bloomfield and His Circle, Edited By Tim Fulford and Lynda Pratt
TEI

193. Robert Bloomfield to Mary Ann Bloomfield, 30 October 1806* 

Canterbury, Oct 30, 1806

My Dear Mary

I came to the Old City yesterday by a coach from Rochester, at which place and at Chatham, I have been since saturday evening last, for on that day I walk'd over Boxley Hill, to Rochester (about 8 miles) from Maidstone, and when Hannah was busy making a noise with her birthday I was tired and in a strange place, but some Coffee, and a glass of wine cured my temporary troubles, and I took a moonlight walk. The same evening with great pleasure I have seen as much of Chatham as the time would permit and have been on board the Victory and seen the spot where Lord Nelson lean'd when he died! I staid a day longer than I intended for my friends contrived to make me stay too long for the Coach, I lost my passage; but took care to be in the way yesterday, and am now writing at Mr Wm Kingsford's at Barton Mills near Canterbury. I dine tomorrow at Mr. Sampson Kingsford's at Sturry, a little further on the Margate road. The weather holds highly in my favour, the Country is delightfull; here is a most noble and venerable old Cathedral of larger dimentions than Westminster Abbey, and a thousand things to see that I cannot here name. I hope to be at Dover by Monday, and thence to proceed to Deal Ramsgate, and perhaps to Margates for it is but little out of my way, and I shall probably return by Canterbury and Chatham, and from Chatham walk over to Gravesend, and come to London by the Boat. This is my present plan, but if I find that I must alter it, I will write to you again from Dover, or from any where else that may be convenient. My best love to yourself and Father & the Children, and I am ever yours truly

Rob Bloomfield

* BL Add. MS 28268, ff. 220–21 BACK

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September 2009

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