bestowing on the state sons

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NOTES

bestowing on the state sons

As Walton's first letter opens with an expression of the opposed perspectives of men and women (I:L1:1 and note), so this initial paragraph of the first chapter accentuates the concern of the patriarchy with replicating itself. Alphonse Frankenstein's sense of public purpose is to reproduce himself for the good of the state. By suppressing the role of the female in this process, he paradoxically voices what will become his son's obsession with creating a new man without the intervention of woman. With that creation in mind, however, it does not require of the reader an undue stretching of the sense to regard the distinctive tone of this language, so abstracted and clinical, as being more characteristic of Victor than of his father.