a sense of justice

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NOTES

a sense of justice

We are to recall that the Frankenstein family tradition has been to enter into public service, most particularly acting in the capacity of syndics, or magistrates (I:1:1). Thus Alphonse Frankenstein's sense of rectitude may be advanced here as a standard whereby to measure that of his son, also that of his society. At the same time, as a man who is so completely bound by the system he has served that he cannot conceive that it might act wrongly, or who is so unprepared to recognize injustice as a potential outcome of the weighing of purely circumstantial evidence, Alphonse Frankenstein, the representative citizen of Geneva, may have so narrow a perspective on truth that, even were it to appear self-evident, it might still never be wholly just.