It was to be decided

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NOTES

It was to be decided

Victor's characteristic passive verb construction reasserts itself here, in circumstances where, since he has been out of the country for so long, he is the only member of his family without an understood obligation to the court. The passive mood does suggest his sense that he is trapped without a means of exonerating a person he is certain is innocent. At the same time, in being attached to his own withdrawal from family obligations, it may also indicate a more complicated pattern of causality than Victor might like to believe in, one in which from the first he bears responsibility.