The Gipsy Prince (Haymarket, 24 July 1801) [1] 

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The Gipsy Prince by Thomas Moore and Michael Kelly, Edited By Frederick Burwick
TEI

The Gipsy Prince (Haymarket, 24 July 1801) [1] 

Witness ms.
Transcribed from MS LA 1329, in the collection of John Larpent, Lord Chamberlain's Examiner of Plays (1778-1824), at the Huntington Library.

Witness a.
Thomas Moore, The Gipsy Prince, A Comic Opera in Two Acts, Now Performing with Universal applause at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket, Compos'd & Selected by Michael Kelly (Printed for Michael Kelly, to be had at his Music Warehouse, No. 9 New Lisle Street, Leicester Square, & at all Music Shops [1801]).

Witness b.
Thomas Moore, Songs, Duets, Trios, and Choruses, in the Gipsy Prince, a Musical Entertainment in Two Acts, first performed at the Theatre-Royal, Hay-Market, July 24, 1801. The Overture and Musick Composed and Selected by Mr. Kelly (London: Printed by T. Woodfall, Little Russell Street , Covent Garden, for Mssrs. Cadell and Davies in the Strand, 1801).

Witness c.
The Gipsy Prince; or, The Loves of Don Sebastian de Nurillo, and the Fair Antonia, translated from the Spanish. By C. Moor, Esq. To which is added, The Corsair; or The Italian Nuptials. (London: J. Roach. 1801). 64pp. -- Front. dated Sept. 7, 1801. [BL shelfmark: 12330.e.37.(2.)].

Page
The Gipsey Prince
A Musical Entertainment
Act 1. & 2.

Theatre Royal Haymarket
17.th July 1801.


The Gipsey Prince
A Musical Entertainment

in
Two Acts

Page

Sir,

This Piece, called the Gipsey Prince, is, with the permission of the Right Honourable, the Lord Chamberlain, intended for Representation at the Theatre Royal Hay-market.

I am Sir

Your most Obedient Servt.

G. Colman

J. Larpent Esqre
Page 1
The Gipsy Prince
a
Musical Piece
in
Two Acts

Characters

  • Don Roderick, Inquisitor
  • Don Dominick, Corregidor
  • Gispsy (sic) Prince
  • Rincon
  • Old Jew
  • Alcaide
  • Peasants, Gispsy's, Alguazils, &c
  • Antonia, Neice (sic) to Don Roderick
  • Poppee, Hindú Gipsy Women
  • Lachimee
  • Peasant Girls Gipsy Women &c
  • Chorus
Page 2

Act First

Scene First

The Suburbs of Murcia
Peasant Men and Women dancing before a Cottage,
while others sitting at the Door are playing on Mandolins and Singing


Chorus

Happy the hearts that love has blest
With such a tie, so sweet as this:
For all their Nights, are Nights of rest,
And all their days are days of bliss.
And Time shall ne'er their Love eclipse,
Tho' it may steal their fire away;
But, like their roses on their lips,
Their joys shall soften not decay.
Compare all witnesses
Page 3
Rincon
That's right—frisk it away—there's not a Man in Murcia loves merriment more than Rincon—go on—I'll caper it with the best of you.

(dances)

Diego
Poh! Here's this troublesome Rincon. What my good Cavallero—still at your old trick of meddling in other people's business?
Rincon
Ha! How do you do? Why I own I do like to have a hand and a foot in everything going forward – but what are you about? merry-making, eh?
Diego
If we must give you a full Account of ourselves—I am Diego.
Rincon
Go on—I knew that before —how naturally the fellow puts himself foremost!
Diego
(sulkily) Well—this is Blanch—and we've just been married—are you satisfied now?
Rincon
Perfectly at my ease—and this is Blanch, eh?
Page 4

(Going up to her)

Blanch
(curtsying awkwarly (sic))Yes, Sir, at your service.
Rincon
(With his back to the Husband—sometimes looking round at him and from him to Blanch)Well, Child—to be sure there is a variety of tastes, but in the choosing of a man (looking down at himself)
Diego
What is the fellow at?
Rincon
(to Blanch)By our lady of the Rock, thou has got a most delicate lip, Child.
Blanch
A pair of them, Sir, at your service.
Rincon
At my service—egad, I think I should like to be meddling there too (going to kiss her)
Diego
(interposing) To that I have a trifling objection—and so, good bye to you, Master Go-Between. come along, Girls let the thing dance by itself.

Exeunt Peasants.

Rincon
Odso—the fellow is as nice about his Wife, as if she was his own property, but we've learn't better things now-a-days. No—No—a man's wife us'd to belong to him
Page 5
but the Husbandnow is put away among the moveables.

Rincon
My Heart I confess has had amorous fidgets,
For Mollies, and Dollies, and Sukies and Bridgets,
But thanks to my Stars! by some lucky miscarriage,
I've kept my Neck safe from the Halter of Marriage.
My first love was Dame Plumpton, so ample & fat,
Like a map of the World, round-about, & all that,
I tried to persuade her—she said that she wouldn't—
I could never come round her, no curse me, I couldn't.
The next was a nice little ABCdarian,
The Daughter of Lingo, our Parish Grammarian,
But we ne'er could agree in our Love Education,
For she still declin'd, when I wish'd Conjugation.
Then I said to another, if you'll be my Wife,
Like a couple of Bells, we'll ring nicely thro' life,
But, by Jove, if I'd had the ill luck to entrap her,
I'd have found the sweet Bell the dev'l of a Clapper!
&a &a &a
 [2]  
Page 6
Scene 2nd

Discovers Gipsies seated round a Fire in the background. They begin a low, melancholy Dirge

Bleak rains may fall or Winds whistle over us,
Nothing but Heaven and darkness to cover us!
Then starting up burst into a lively Chorus.
Merry we still fly
Where our fates lead us,
Winter or chill Sky
Cannot impede us. &.c &.c
Compare all witnesses

Enter to them the Gipsy Prince in a fanciful half Eastern Dress.

Gipsy Prince
Well, fellows, we are now in Murcia, and near the City. I know not how we strollers are receiv'd in Spain, but I'll on to enquire and be back with you at Night fall.
1st Gipsy.
Where shall we pitch our Tents?
Gipsy Prince
Some distance hence among those Willows. This Dress will at all events secure me from suspicion. Away.

Exeunt Gipsies.

Page 7
Gipsy Prince
Where shall my wanderings and adventures cease? after travelling thro' the World, unknowing and unknown, I now am made a Chief of Vagabonds. Well, well, it matters not where I go. I know no Parent but Nature, and she gives me the World for my home!

I've roam'd thro' many a weary round,
I've wander'd East and West;
Pleasure in every Clime I've found,
But sought in vain for rest.
While Glory sighs for other spheres
I feel that one's too wide
And think a home which love endears,
Were worth the World beside.
The Needle thus, too rudely mov'd,
Wanders, unconscious where;
'Till having found the place it lov'd
It trembling settles there.
Compare all witnesses

Going out starts back upon seeing an old Man dragg'd in by two Alguazils.

Page 8
Ha! what's here!
Old Jew
In mercy's name, allow me to escape,—I am old and not worth persecuting.
Alguazils
Old Sinners are the worst of all—come along

(they drag him)

Gipsy Prince
May I ask, Gentlemen, what functions do you bear?
Alguazils
Have you dropped from the Moon? We are Officers of the Inquisition.
Gipsy Prince
Whither do you drag that poor old Man?
Alguazils
To a Dungeon to be sure.
Gipsy Prince
What is his Crime?
Alguazils
He is a Jew.
Old Jew
Oh! Sir—some secret Enemy has ruin'd me. I go to suffer Death ever without knowing my accusers.
Gipsy Prince
Is he charg'd with no other Crime than this?
Alguazils
I tell you he is a Jew.
Gipsy Prince
Is this the Country of Religion? [...] [3]  shame on you, persecuting Hypocrites, release your Prisoner this instant.
Page 9
Alguazils
(eying him with derision and turning to his Companion) Here's a fine fellow for you. Why, where have you come from, young Hector? [...] [4] 
Gipsy Prince
What, do you back your cruelty with insolence? Villains—I'll shew you that one arm in the cause of Humanity is worth a hundred hirelings of oppression.

(Draws)

Alguazils
Here's rebellion against the Holy Office—down with him—down with him.

(While they are fighting Rincon pops his head in)

Rincon
[...] [5] —Ho, ho— Alguazils, and Swords drawn. I'll not meddle here. Bravo, Alguazils—knock him down—knock him down—I'll not meddle—I'm off.

(Exit).

1st Alguazil
Oh! I'm hurt—take to your heels—the dog has wounded me.

(they run off)

Old Jew
(falling on his knees before the Gipsy Prince) Generous Stanger! you have preserved my life, but your
Page 10
own I fear will be the forfeit. You know not the powers of the Tribunal—to oppose it's (sic) Ministers is Death, and I fear you have wounded one of them—for Heaven's sake fly and preserve yourself. You carry with you the prayers of one who owes you his liberty and his life.

(Exit, Old Man)

Gipsy Prince
Thus runs my fate from one difficulty to another. Must I conceal myself? No—let them come—and yet—to be the sport of such ruffians—the thought is worse than death—this way seems to lead to the City. Let what will happen there is no one to weep for me!

(Exit)

Scene 3rd.

One one side a Bower, and on the other a Turret. Enter Don Roderick and Don Dominick.

Don Roderic
As you say, my friend, I wish your boy Sebastian was here—he would just be a match for the Girl—but he's dead, isn't he?
Don Dominic
Alas! I fear so,
Don Roderic
Then he'll not do for my Neice (sic).
Don Dominic
When my Brother went with the Missionaries to
Page 11
the East, I unfortunately sent the Child along with him, an—
Don Roderic
(aside) Now have I heard this Story a hundred times—Ay, Well?
Don Dominic
I sent my boy Sebastian with the Missionaries
Don Roderic
And then lost him and he's dead or gone to the deuce; and you don't know what's become of him. Don't tell your old Stories so often, Brother Dominick, and you'll be a much more agreeable Companion.
Don Dominic
Well, well, you are hasty, old Roderick—but, how is your Neice (sic)?
Don Roderic
My Neice (sic)! very well—fine girl—but don't know what to do with her.
Don Dominic
I say, marry her off your hands as fast as you can.
Don Roderic
That's what I wish, but the jade doesn't seem to know what Matrimony means—she has got an old broken winded guittar that I believe she'll be married to for the rest of her life

(the guittar heard without).

Ay,
Page 12
here she is with that plaguy instrument of hers, the very curse of my life.

Enter Antonia singing to the accompaniment of her Guittar.

Trio.

Antonia
Sweet oh! sweet the Spring is coming,
Natures heavenly blush appears,
Don Roderic
Stop oh! stop your cursed strumming,
Or you'll kill me thro' my Ears,
Don Dominic
Bravo! delightful—
Don Roderic
Bah! tis frightful—
Antonia
Uncle, fye—'tis charming musick.
Don Roderic
Neice (sic), 'tis enough to make a Jew sick.
Don Dominic
Repeat that air, Miss.
Don Roderic
Do if you dare, Miss.
Antonia
Sweet oh! sweet the Spring is coming &ca
Compare all witnesses

Enter a Messenger

Don Roderic
What now?
Messenger
A Prisoner has just been rescued from the Officers.
Page 13
Don Dominic
[...] [6]  Recued (sic)?—by whom?
Messenger
By a Stranger who has wounded one of them and escaped.
Don Roderic
What!—Rebellion against the Sante Officio? Oh! we'll tickle him, the dog! Catch him, and with our accustomed Civily (sic), we'll give him his choice whether he'll be roasted or—boiled.

(Ext Messenger)

Don Dominic
Come, Roderick. This offence is civil as well as religious We'll to the Alcaide, and order out a guard after him.
Don Roderic
Do you hear, Niece? Throw away your guittar and look for a Husband; a much better play thing, I assure you. Don't you remember what Gomez, the old ballad-monger says
Marry for money, for love or for mirth,
Take a Husband for use or for show'
'Tis better by far to lead one Ape on earth
Than perhaps lead a hundred below.

(Ext. Don Dom. & Don Rod.)

Antonia
How Uncle does abuse thee, thou dear companion of many a solitary hour

(looking at her Guittar)

he says
Page 14
a husband would be a better play-thing—it may be so, but has a husband much musick in him?—Here are two, three, six frets—Ah! there are more frets in Matrimony than that, and then, one couldn't play upon a husband so easily

(Archly, and striking the Chords of the Instrument)

The Gipsy Prince appears on the Walls of the Garden, looking back as if pursued.

Gipsy Prince
I am mistaken, I think—they were not Officers—yet they eyed me suspiciously—no matter—over I go.

(jumps down)

I cannot be worse than in the hands of those—

(starts on seeing Antonia, who screams)

A Woman!

(advancing to her)

Lady—if you can pardon such an intrusion—
Antonia
Pray, Sir, who are you, that thus—

(hesitating)

Gipsy Prince
I am a Stranger, Madam, but a few hours in Murcia. Passing thro' the Suburbs, I saw an unfortunate old Man, whom the Officers were dragging without mercy to a dungeon. I pitied, I rescued him. This offence, they tell me, is death—pursued, and flying, I know not whither—Heavens! how beautiful

(aside)

Page 15
Antonia
But Sir, can you imagine—

(hesitating)

Gipsy Prince
I see that I offend. Yes, tho' looking thus is life, and death be without those walls, I go—
Antonia
Stay, Sir, what would you have me do?
Gipsy Prince
Nothing for worlds that could a moment disturb you—if I might conceal myself in these gardens till night, the darkness then might suffer me to escape, but—
Antonia
(aside)I have often wished for an opportunity to do good, now I have it, I will not lose it.

(to him)

Yes—Stranger, you shall have concealment here.
Gipsy Prince
(falling on his knees before her) Oh! thus let me thank you, not for the life you preserve which is nothing; but for the feeling that warms you, which is every thing.
Antonia
(aside) Heaven grant I feel no more than compassion—Will you be my prisoner?
Gipsy Prince
Yes, for ever.
Antonia
Here is a little Turret—come you shall see it—

(The (sic) go over to the Turret)

There you may rest secure, & and as soon as it is dark—
Don Roderic
(within)Search the whole city for him. The
Page 16
Corregidore will sit in the morning. [one line inked out]
Antonia
My Uncle!—in—in, or we are [...] [7]  ruined.

Shuts him in the Tower and runs in trepidation to the Guittar.

(Enter Don Roderick)

Don Roderic
Hey day! still at it? house, house, girl—it's growing late—Arn't (sic) you afraid of hobgoblins? They'll be dancing the blue devils' jig about you presently.
Antonia
True Sir

(looking towards the Turret)

when one is alone, strange figures will appear to one, as you say.
Don Roderic
What the Plague! you don't see anything appearing now, do you?
Antonia
Oh! no, Sir—go in—and I shall follow you—
Don Roderic
Pho! come along, Girl. I must be early in the morning.
Antonia
Pray, Uncle—I have but to—but to look after my little bird in the Turret.
Don Roderic
A Bird in the Turret?—come, let's see—I like birds.
Antonia
Dearest Uncle—no. You'll disturb it.
Don Roderic
Not at all—no matter (going towards the Turret)
Page 17
Antonia
(preventing him)Besides, Sir, 'tis a Singing bird, & you're not fond of Musick.
Don Roderic
Singing Bird, is it?—Oh! curse your singing—well, well—follow me immediately.

(Ext Don Rod)

Antonia
(running to the Turret)Hist! hist! but one word more. —

(leads out the Gipsy Prince)

there is a little bolt inside, by which you may command the door, and as soon as you think it dark enough to escape—but—but—is this the last time I shall ever see you?
Gipsy Prince
First time and last!—Oh! that would indeed be too little.
Antonia
Say you so?—and will you stay till morning here?
Gipsy Prince
Till morning?—Oh! 'twill be a blessed morning that brings you back to bless my eyes again.
Antonia
(aside)I am so happy!—as soon as it is dawn, I will come to you and the sound of the Guittar (sic) shall be the Signal for you to appear. Farewell, go to your lodging—I must after my Uncle.

Duett.

Antonia
Good night, good night, I must away,
Altho' my heart would bid me stay.
Gipsy Prince
Oh Lady, Say good night once more.
And I'll repeat it o'er and o'er.
Page 18
Both
Till the first glance of dawning light
Shall find us saying still "Good night"—
Good night—Good night!
Compare all witnesses
Scene 4.

The Gipsies Tents among the Willows almost dark.

Duett & Chorus.

Poppee
(Stealing from one of the Tents)
Where Gipsey gone? night stealing on
Come, come, come To the Willows fly
See now they creep from yonder steep
No fearee now de watchful eye.
Lachimee
Here we have spread in the Willows our bed
Fly, fly, fly—to the Willows fly—
Hush, hush, hum—Soft dey come
No fearee now de watchful eye—

(A Murmur of Gipsey-men, heard at some distance)

Poppee
Page 19
Oh! Gipsey man, no care for wind,
In summer glow, or winter Snow,
Gipsey man no changes find
His Sunshine all is in de mind .
Chorus of Gipsies at a Distance.
Hush, hush, hum—we Gipsies come—
Fly, fly, fly—to the Willows fly—
Soft we creep to our tents of Sleep
Sealed is now the watchful eye.
Gipsies entering in full burst of Chorus.
Here, here, here—we Gipsies come &c.
Compare all witnesses
1st Gipsy
Where can this Prince of ours be? Something has happened him in the City, I am afraid.
2d Gipsy.
Soft!—who comes yonder? Stand by—we'll sport him.

(Enter Rincon)

Rincon
Dear me!—how busy I've been! helping the Alguazils all over the city to find that damn'd sacrilegious dog. Lord, lord—how anyone can meddle with the Inquisition! Women and the Holy Office—women and the Holy office are never to be meddled with.
Page 20

(Poppee & Lachimee come at each side of him)

Poppee
How do you do, Sir?
Lachimee
How do you do, Sir?
Rincon
Hey-day! talk of a devil, and two of them appear

(looking alternately at them)

. Black—yellow—his livery at all events.
Poppee & Lachimee
Dear, dear, what fine dressy man! —see—see—nice fine

(turning him about)

Rincon
Do you really admire this dress—'pon my Soul these Gipsies have no bad taste I find.
Poppee & Lachimee
(pointing to different parts of his dress)give um dis, give um dat.
Rincon
What my hat?—what my Sword, eh! no, excuse me—
Lachimee
(Snatching off his Hat) She got herself here, buddy Quonimo, here fine hat for you—

(putting it on one of the Gipsey men)

Rincon
Oh! ho!—this is their taste for my dress—very flattering indeed—
Poppee
(coming up roguishly) Me very fond of you—love you plenty—you glad?
Rincon
Oh! certainly—very glad. Your love is extremely dear to me—and these are all keep-
Page 21
sakes, you're taking, I suppose?
Poppee
Iss—me wish fine bit of your hair, put in gold ring, eh?
Rincon
'Twould be rather difficult, I believe

(putting his hand to his head)

Poppee
Oh! me find plenty look

(pulls off his Wig and shews it round)

See—here fine wig to put in a ring.

(They all gather round him and seem emulous in tearing at his dress)

Rincon
By my chastity, Ladies, you'll leave me not fit to be seen.

The Alguazils rush in with the Opening of a Finale.

 [8]  

End of Act 1.

Page 1

Act 2

Scene 1.

The Gardens & the Turret. Enter Antonia with a Basket on her arm and a Guittar.

Antonia
How my heart beats! I hope they have not observed me. Oh! if my bird has not flown I shall be happy.

(Strikes the Chords of her Guittar)

(Enter Gipsey Prince from the Turret)

(Strikes the Chords of her Guittar)

(Enter Gipsey Prince from the Turret)

Duett.

Antonia
Come from thy Cage, silly bird, dost thou hear,
Thy mistress is singing to thee.
Say, while she grants thee a Prison so dear,
Oh! cans't thou e'er wish to be free?
Gipsy Prince
I knew by the Magic which stole on my ear,
That my mistress was singing to me
And while she grants me a Prison so dear,
I never can wish to be free.
Both
Captive to thee, thus, and love
Where is the heart that could rove?
Compare all witnesses
Antonia
Tell me, dear Stranger—
Page 2
Gipsy Prince
Oh! say not stranger, call me—

(hesitates)

Antonia
What?
Gipsy Prince
What you will—

(Sighs)

I've never had a name. I never lived till now—

(takes her hand affectionately)

her lips should give the name, whose eyes have given the life.
Antonia
See, I have stolen this little basket of refreshments for you. I'm so afraid that Uncle will come this way—feel how my heart beats!
Gipsy Prince
(aside)This is too much. I must not expose this innocent Girl to such dangers. —No, 'tis cowardly.
Antonia
Come, we may venture to walk round yonder path, and then, my dear, dear Nameless, you shall tell me all your story.

(Exeunt.)

(Enter Don Roderick & the Alcaide)

Don Roderic
Well?
Alcaide
They have hunted him, your Excellency, all round the Suburbs.
Don Roderic
Hunted him! ay, ay—they are fine beagles—after a Heretic—"Stole away—stole away!" is enough for them, but can they find no traces of the offender?
Page 3
Alcaide
The found a party of Strolling Gipsies who arrived in Murcia but yesterday. Some of them they apprehended and others escaped—from their information we guess it must be their Captain, or Prince, as they call him, who committed this Murder
Don Roderic
Very likely these fellows think no more of poking a man's Guts than of stirring their fire—but Murder, did you say?
Alcaide
Yes, if the report be true which I heard this morning, that the Alguazil he wounded is dead.
Don Roderic
Ferret him out, ferret him out—we must make a shining example—by the mass, we'll make an illumination of him.

(During the latter part of this conversation, Antonia & Gipsey Prince Enter, but seeing Don Roderick, She steals to the Turret door, opens it cautiously while the Gipsey Prince gets in—just as she closes the door, Don Roderic turns about)

Don Roderic
Hey day!—abroad so early, Antonia? What, with your pet in the Turret, eh?
Antonia
Yes, Uncle. I've been feeding it.
Don Roderic
What out of this

(examining the Basket)

. Egad , your Pet has a prodigious good stomach.
Page 4
Antonia
Oh, Sir!—that—that basket belongs to the Gardener.
Don Roderic
Ay, ay, so I thought—a fine swallow is the only bird that can manage that breakfast. Goodbye, Girl—I've death upon my hands to-day. This fellow that rescued the Jew must be Pickled. We Inquisitors shall go to the devil, if we don't send others in our places.

(Exit)

Antonia
And all this against thee, thou dear, unhappy wanderer! Oh! Heaven avert it, for I fear I cannot.
 [9]  

Exit

Enter Rincon (beckoning as to someone without)

Rincon
Come, you little Gipsey—come into this Garden & I'll give you a kiss. What!—you won't eh?

(Pulls in Poppee)

Poppee
No—dis is not kissy day wid me.
Rincon
So, so—you've set days for kissing, have you? I suppose you're like the Thieves in Salamanca, whose piety will not let them steal on Sunday.
Page 5
Poppee
Iss—but me steal every day.
Rincon
The devil you do!
Poppee
(looking round) How fine Garden here—dis your garden all?
Rincon
Yes—all mine—all

(aside)

Never laid eyes on it before.
Poppee
(Sees the Basket) Ha! what you got here?
Rincon
She's at it. She's at it.
Poppee
Here good eaty man. Com me stop you mout dis way.
Rincon
Ay, at (sic), while my appetite is for her—Her appetite is for the breakfast. Let me see

(goes to her)

By my sobriety, Here's Wine—not a bad thing, Gipsey

(drinks)

What! eating meat on a Fast day—Oh fye!—see how I abstain from flesh and—if you don't come kiss me, I'll say you're a downright Heathen—Were you ever christen'd, you rogue?
Poppee
No, Nebber—what dat?
Rincon
Oh! Lord, Oh! Lord

(He leads her forward & fills a Glass)

Duett

Rincon
Before then I fall to kissing you,
Here is a drop to baptise you;
Wine is the thing to Christen you,
Water I'd never advise you.
May I ne'er have the luck to be tipsey
If I an't in love with you dearly --
Compare all witnesses
Page 6

Rincon
Love you, my sweet little Gipsey,
As well as my bottle—or nearly.

Chorus

Rincon
Oh! by the toe of St Nicolly
Poppee
At Chee chee—you swear man.
Rincon
I've such an itching to tickle you—
Poppee
Tickle me! Ha!—you dare man!
Poppee
What you come lie, you tinkee
I know not your love to a tittle,
Bottle trown by, when you drinkee,
And me, when you kiss um a little—
After you kissee and smackee once,
Woman still live to torment 'ee—
But de Ghost of bottle you crackee once,
No fear will rise up to haunt 'ee.

(Chorus repeated & She Runs off.)

Compare all witnesses
 [10]    [11]  
Rincon
There she goes—off with her—the feet of these Jades are generally as nimble as their Tongues, and old Nick himself can't keep pace with either. What's here? a Guittar?—Lord, if I had seen this while that little guinea-pig was here, I'd have soften'd her heart with a sequidilla in an instant. Nothing like musick for putting
Page 7
crotchets in a woman's head—So—

(He brushes over the Strings)

Gipsy Prince
(rushing from the Turret.) At length you're come. Oh! welcome dearest—'Sdeath! we're betray'd! & ruined!

(turns aside)

Rincon
(aside)Now shall I be kicked into the streets for my impertinence, and my Musick all end with a B. flat in the Gutter. Sir—

(advancing)

if I may be excused for this intrusion—
Gipsy Prince
So, so, so—he is not of the family(turns round to Rincon, who stares at and recollects him).
Rincon
(aside)Ho—ho—are you found at last, my Gentleman. Here's business for me—here's meddling to my heart's delight. I'll run to the Court this instant. Good morning to you, Sir.
Gipsy Prince
This fellow seems to know —I must detain him or I am lost—Stop, Sir (Seizes him)
Rincon
Dear Sir—You're so pressing. I'll call again

(aside)

with a Guard.
Gipsy Prince
Come, come, no trifling—do you see that Turret?—in there this instant: I must locklock you up.
Rincon
Lock me up? Lord, Sir!

(aside)

Oh! The damn'd dog—he might as well take the bread out of my Mouth. Sure, Sir, you're not in earnest.
Page 8
Gipsy Prince
Peace fool—and do as I command —
Rincon
Oh! dear—well, if I must be lock'd up, just allow me, Sir, to take a companion with me (takes the Bottle & Glass, and the Gipsy Prince locks him in)
Gipsy Prince
Where is Antonia!—but yesterday life was a burden to me, and now, love gives a value to every moment of existence—Ah! Antonia!

(Exit)

(Enter Antonia in terror & agitation)

Antonia
What shall I do? The guards are searching every where

(looking towards the Turret)

Oh! must I see thee torn from my Arms to a Dungeon? Never, never!—Hush!—I hear footsteps—something must be done instantly—

(takes up the Guittar & hurries over the Strings)

. Come, come—

(Rincon makes a noise within &ca)

What can be the meaning of this? He cannot get out.

(She unlocks the door. Rincon rushes out half drunk and catches her in his arms. She shrieks.)

Rincon
That's right my little angel of deliverance—You let me out just in time, for I had nearly finished the last drop of my bottle.
Antonia
(loudly)Oh! Heaven—where is he?
Rincon
Hush, my dear—there's a damned sulky thief lurking here abouts—but don't be frighten'd—don't be
Page 9
frighten'd, my love; for I'll bring a guard on him in five minutes

(going towards the door—She follows him, seizes his Skirts and kneels)

Trio

Antonia
Oh! in pity hear me suing
By compassion's dearest sigh.
Rincon
Ah! I see what she'd be doing,
Well, we'll talk on't by and by.
Antonia
(holding)Dearest Sir—
Rincon
The deuce is in it.
Antonia
But a minute—

(Enter Gipsy Prince just as Rincon is escaping)

Gipsy Prince
Stop, knave, at your peril stir.
Rincon
Curse him, here he is again.
Gipsy Prince
Back thou meddler, to thy den.
Rincon
Oh! dear —

(NB.—during the Trio they lock Rincon up again and then Exuent.)

Compare all witnesses

(NB.—during the Trio they lock Rincon up again and then Exuent.)

(Enter Alguazil's.)

1st Alguazil
From what the Peasant told us he must be hiding somewhere in this Garden

(They search the bower)

You may swear he has chosen the finest corner he
Page 10
could find—

(They look round the Stage)

.
2d Alguazil
Let us try this Turret—

(they unlock the door)

What's here? a fellow fast asleep!—this must be he, seize him and carry him off.
Rincon
(who wakes and comes out somewhat intoxicated)Lord bless me, what a dream I've had—stand off an I'll tell you—I thought a damn'd ill-looking fellow—very like you—

(to one of the Alguazils)

came and seized me by the throttle

(the Alguazil seizes him)

something that way but not quite so hard, and told me I should be hanged—
1st Alguazil
So you shall be hang'd, you reprobate.
Rincon
My dream's out—isn't that comical?
2nd Alguazil
Come along. You might well dream of hanging, after the murder you've committed.
Rincon
Murder?—Let me recollect—No—I don't think I ever committed murder.
1st Alguazil
Yes, but you have—no later than yesterday evening, and we've come to take you before the Corigidore.
Rincon
(in afright)Do you mean me?—pon my Soul
Page 11
gentlemen, I never was guilty of murder in all my life—its one of the things I never meddle with. I'm the most harmless man in Murcia—never committed Manslaughter or Suicide, except once upon a Pig—and I'll tell you you how that happened
1st Alguazil
Hold your Tongue, you Heretic, and come along.

(they drag him off)

(Enter the Gipsey Prince & Antonia)

Gipsy Prince
By the noise, they must have been here—and, see! the Turret is opened. Now, on my knees I intreat you, determine something, or we are ruined.
Antonia
Oh! that I could determine.
 [12]  
Gipsy Prince
'Tis death for me to stay, 'tis more than death to fly, while you remain behind—but will you, can you be the partner of a wanderer?
Antonia
I shudder at the thought. Oh! do not urge me—go save yourself, and sometimes think of me.
Gipsy Prince
No, let them come—'tis sweeter thus to—

(going to embrace her—some of the Officers rush in)

Antonia
Oh! Heavens—here they are!—
Page 12
Officer
That is the Gipsey Prince.
2nd Officer
And this is his protectress—force her from him.
Gipsy Prince
Stand off—as long as there is a Pulse in this heart not one of you shall dare to seperate us—look up, Antonia.
Antonia
Yes—tho' I could not in life, at least I will follow you in death
Officer
And do you mean to resist going along with us?
Gipsy Prince
No she revives. I am now at your disposal.

(Officers put Chains on his hands)

2nd Officer
The lady must with us too

(offering to put Chains on her)

Gipsy Prince
What!—are you chaining her hands? Cowards! Put all your fetters here

(Shewing his own)

You need not dread resistance from her—Come, Antonia—Lead on.

(Exeunt)

Scene 2. The Tribunal

Don Dominick, Don Roderick, a Secretary. Guards attending with Rincon Prisoner—and Gipsies in fetters behind—Discover'd.

Don Roderic
(to an Alguazil)In the Rue Larga did you say?
Alguazil
Yes, your excellency.
Don Roderic
By our Lady, the description agrees with my garden, perfectly—but that's impossible!
Don Dominic
(to Rincon)Well, Sir, you know the Offence for which you are brought here.
Page 13
Rincon
Not I, 'pon my Soul. —I say it in pure sobriety—I was to be sure a little bewilder'd with the bottle—but there is nothing like Alguazils for bringing a man to his senses, or indeed, frightening him out of them
Don Dominic
Wasn't one of your gipsies seen to go into that Garden with you?
Rincon
No, my lord, as I hope to be—yet stay—there did some little black thing creep in after me—but I assure you, the devil, black as it was, did not tempt me to any thing.
Poppee
(running to him from among the Gipsies)Ha!—you call 'um devil, and you not member you want to kiss devil plenty, eh?—take dat, man

(Slaps his face)

Rincon
Hey day!—my little Proserpine, between gown and Petticoat, I am in a pretty pucker.
Don Dominic
To the point, Sir—Your rescue of the Jew from our Officer—
Rincon
[word inked out] Phew!—

(whistles and dances about)

I have it now—I have it—my friend in the Turret—my friend in the Turret! damme (sic), the wine washed it all out of my head. I'll tell your lordship—Here's meddling for me—

(Enter a Messenger)

Messenger
My Lord, the Gipsey is caught at last—the other party of Officers has found him, and the Lady who
Page 14
concealed him. They are Prisoners without.
Don Dominic
Bring in the Gipsey—let the Lady wait.

(Exit Messenger)

Rincon
There now—business taken out of my hands again. Oh! if my head did not swim so often, what a man I'd be!—I'll tell you all, my Lord—

(Re Enter Messenger with the Gipsey Prince fettered and Guarded)

Don Dominic
(Starts up on seeing him, and continues to look at him with earnestness.)
Gipsy Prince
Whatever punishment this Court prepares for me, I pray you only that it may be speedy, and for the Lady, whose humanity gave me an asylum, you cannot be so cruel as to injure her. —If she has erred in protecting a Criminal, humanity even in it's errors, is amiable; and—
Rincon
(interrupting him)Humanity! Oh, Lord! my Lord, [...] [13]  the fellow was so humane as to be near cutting my throat about half an hour ago.
Don Dominic
(Still gazing with earnestness)His features!—Voice!—that Eastern dress, every thing confirms me—Young Stranger, be not surprised at my questions -
Page 15
Where is your birthplace?
Gipsy Prince
I know not.
Don Dominic
Where have you passed your life?
Gipsy Prince
It's younger days in 'Ava.
Don Dominick
(aside)I cannot contain myself. Who were your Parents?
Gipsy Prince
I never yet could learn—the earliest guardian I can remember, and [...] [14]  him I too soon lost, was a Spanish Monk, who called himself my Uncle. His name—
Don Dominic
Alvarez—Yes—

(Embracing him)

You are—you are my Sebastian—my long-lost darling Son.
Gipsy Prince
My Father!—And I, a criminal before him!
Don Dominic
No, no—knock off his Chain. You are innocent of murder—the Man whom you wounded but slightly is recovered—and now—congratulate me Roderick, congratulate me, all. This is my boy—my Sebastian—is he not a fine fellow, Roderick?
Don Roderic
Oh! very well, indeed!

(aside)

for a Vagabond.
Gipsy Prince
Father! I cannot shew half my happiness, while there is one dear wish of my heart left ungratified—this day gives me a Parent—but—there is another tie—The Lady—

(Antonia is brought in)

Page 16
Don Roderic
(Staring and rubbing his eyes)By all that's miraculous—it's my Niece.
Don Dominic
Antonia! why this is as it should be.
Don Roderic
So—this is your bird in the Turret, Miss?—a fine Cock-canary indeed!—You Jade to [word inked out] go shelter a Heretic, a—
Don Dominic
(clapping his hand on his mouth)Stop, Roderick, he is now my Son, and your Niece may assist us to convert him.
 [15]  

The End

Notes

[1]

Transcribed from MS LA 1329, in the collection of John Larpent, Lord Chamberlain's Examiner of Plays (1778-1824), at the Huntington Library.

Matter omitted from performance is placed in angle brackets < >
Words and phrases inked out illegibly are noted in square brackets; if legible, transcription is given in strikethrough text.

Additions from published versions of the songs are placed in square brackets and marked with superscript [ ]a [ ]b [ ]c indicating the three published versions of the songs:
[ ]a
Thomas Moore, The Gipsy Prince, A Comic Opera in Two Acts, Now Performing with Universal applause at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket, Compos'd & Selected by Michael Kelly (Printed for Michael Kelly, to be had at his Music Warehouse, No. 9 New Lisle Street, Leicester Square, & at all Music Shops [1801]).
[ ]b
Thomas Moore, Songs, Duets, Trios, and Choruses, in the Gipsy Prince, a Musical Entertainment in Two Acts, first performed at the Theatre-Royal, Hay-Market, July 24, 1801. The Overture and Musick Composed and Selected by Mr. Kelly (London: Printed by T. Woodfall, Little Russell Street, Covent Garden, for Mssrs. Cadell and Davies in the Strand, 1801).
[ ]c
The Gipsy Prince; or, The Loves of Don Sebastian de Nurillo, and the Fair Antonia, translated from the Spanish. By C. Moor, Esq. To which is added, The Corsair; or The Italian Nuptials. (London: J. Roach. 1801). 64pp. -- Front. dated Sept. 7, 1801. [BL shelfmark: 12330.e.37.(2.)].

BACK

[2] Song 3 ("I remember") appears in witnesses a, b, and c, but not the ms. Click here to compare these witnesses. BACK

[3] [six or seven words inked out] BACK

[4] [two lines inked out] BACK

[5] [four words inked out] BACK

[6] [two words inked out] BACK

[7] [word inked out] BACK

[8] Song 9 ("In the name and glory of the Inquisitory") appears in witnesses a, b, and c, but not the ms. Click here to compare these witnesses. BACK

[9] Song 11 ("Yes now I shall think of that heartbroken maid") appears in witnesses a, b, and c, but not the ms. Click here to compare these witnesses. BACK

[10] Song 14 ("Oh me was born to wander") appears in witnesses a, b, and c, but not the ms. Click here to compare these witnesses. BACK

[11] Song 15 ("Fye, fye, you're quite a sinner, girl") appears in witnesses b and c, but not the ms. Click here to compare these witnesses. BACK

[12] Song 17 ("Yes! for thee too charming Stranger") appears in witnesses a, b, and c, but not the ms. Click here to compare these witnesses. BACK

[13] [five or six words inked out] BACK

[14] [word inked out] BACK

[15] Song 18 ("The Gipsey Prince no more shall roam") appears in witnesses a, b, and c, but not the ms. Click here to compare these witnesses. BACK

Published @ RC

October 2012