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The Collected Letters of Robert Southey Part 4: 1810-1815

2289. Robert Southey to Herbert Hill, 14 August 1813 ⁠* 

Keswick. Aug 14. 1813

The pamphletts [1]  reached me this morning. – I still remain a semi-Cupid, & in spite of the applications which I have used, the swelling of the eyelid continues the same. Today there are rather more appearances of its gathering. Nothing but this detains me.

I have looked thro those pamphletts which were new to me. Marsh [2]  writes likes like a lawyer, keeping out of sight every thing which would make against his own view of the case. It will be easy to expose & chastise him. – Would it not be the best plan to give a compendious history of Sir GB’s administration, & then turn upon his enemies at the end, after exposing examining in notes as I go along, the specific charges?

It is vexatious to be thus detained. The cause cannot I think last many days longer, & I xx {will} secure a place in the mail as soon as it is prudent.

RS.


Notes

* Address: To/The Reverend Herbert Hill/Streatham/Surry.
Stamped: KESWICK / 298
Postmarks: 10o’Clock/ AU 17/ 1813 FNn; E/ 17 AU 17/ 1813
MS: Keswick Museum and Art Gallery
Unpublished. BACK

[1] Pamphlets about the controversy surrounding Sir George Hilaro Barlow’s (1763–1846; DNB) conduct as Governor of Madras. In 1813 Southey was commissioned by Sir George’s brother, William Barlow (1759–1839) a merchant and neighbour of Herbert Hill’s in Streatham, to write a defence of Sir George. The result was the anonymously published pamphlet An Exposure of the Misrepresentations and Calumnies in Mr Marsh’s Review of Sir George Barlow’s Administration at Madras. By the Relatives of Sir George Barlow (1813). BACK

[2] The barrister and MP Charles Marsh (c. 1774–1835; DNB), Review of Some Important Passages in the Late Administration of Sir G. H. Barlow, Bart., at Madras (1813). This attacked Barlow’s conduct as Governor of Madras. BACK

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August 2013