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The Collected Letters of Robert Southey Part 3

1514. Robert Southey to Herbert Hill, 28 September 1808 ⁠* 

Your parcel arrived yesterday afternoon & I have gone thro the papers. I did not before comprehend the precise nature of what you were doing, – of the utility of this there can be no doubt, & the sale of it is a calculable thing: as no ship will trade to Brazil without it. [1] 

It seems to me worthy of consideration whether the original should not be printed on the opposite page to the translation, – many copies would then sell among the Portugueze. But the xxxx xx would be when if At any rate I will add in every instance the original names of places wherever you happen to have omitted them. – You write mangues the common mode is mangoes, & seems to in that shape the word seems to be naturalized.

vindo de mar en fore: I should take to be, ‘coming from the sea, outward-bound,’ – the better way would be to ask some Portugueze captain in London, as the difference is of consequence. It is precisely in the common phraseology of the language that my knowledge is deficient; – their antiquated tongue I probably understand as well as the P. themselves.

My first volume [2]  will end either with the Acclamation, [3]  or the final expulsion of the Dutch, as may best suit the size of the book: a weeks work will bring me to the first period whenever my idle season ends. The next chapter to what you have contains whatever more is to be said of the Tupinambas, [4]  introduced when the Jesuits first begin their dealing with them. The book may go to press whenever the price of paper makes it expedient.

I hope the Cid is published. [5]  – Thalaba is at last sold off, & with a quickened pace: the Long Man of the Row recommends a second edition with as little delay as may be, & I send off the corrected copy to him tomorrow. [6]  – Your papers wait, as you desire, for your farther instructions, & I have written in great haste, that there may be no unnecessary delay.

RS.

Sept. 28. 1808. Keswick.

If you give the chart from Barlœus [7]  of the Maranham Arrowsmith [8]  can get it copied in London.


Notes

* Address: To/ The Reverend Herbert Hill/ Staunton upon Wye/ Hereford/ Single
Stamped: KESWICK/ 298
MS: Keswick Museum
Unpublished. BACK

[1] Hill was compiling his anonymously authored Brazil Pilot to assist ships trading to Brazil. BACK

[2] Southey is referring to his History of Brazil, the first volume of which was published in 1810. BACK

[3] The acclamation in 1640 of Joam IV (1603–1656), as King of Portugal and the Algarves. BACK

[4] The powerful Indian nation which dominated the coast of Brazil. BACK

[5] Southey’s edition of the Chronicle of the Cid (1808). BACK

[6] A second edition of Thalaba the Destroyer was published in 1809. Southey’s letter to Longman has not survived. BACK

[7] Caspar Barlaeus (1584–1648), Rerum per Octennium in Brasilia et Alibi Nuper Gestarum sub Praefectura (1647), a work containing many maps and charts, including this of the Maranham river. Southey’s library, on his death, contained an edition of 1660. BACK

[8] Aaron Arrowsmith (1750–1823; DNB), cartographer of Soho Square, London, renowned for his 1790 large chart of the world. Among Arrowsmith’s other productions were A Map Exhibiting All the New Discoveries in the Interior Parts of North America (1795 rev. 1801, 1802, 1804), Chart of the South Pacific (1798), A New Map of Africa (1802). BACK

Published @ RC

August 2013