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325. Robert Southey to Grosvenor Charles Bedford, 10 June 1798 ⁠* 

Did you remember to take the Letter to the man in Martins Lane? [1] 

Sunday 10 June. 98.

My dear Grosvenor

That I should run thro London without seeing you is unpleasant to me; & will seem strange to you. but will you not allow their due weight to unavoidables? there were two impediments to prevent me – Time & Space. these Grosvenor I could not over come.

It was more than middle day yesterday before I had cleansed myself from my night journey, breakfasted – & was ready to go out. I had then business which could not be delayed – nor was it over till too late an hour to get to Westminster. I had promised to write home by Saturdays mail & that was a business that could not be omitted. this morning – Brixton is far away – & I am very weary & am to pass this night in the mail coach. Term can be kept to day – as eating is doing no manner of work. I called at Lincolns Inn this morning unsuccessfully. yesterday I could not.

Write to me Grosvenor. I shall be at Bath. my mother leaves her present house at Midsummer & has not yet found another. my presence is indispensable. I send the inclosed as written for the post – & your own. God bless you. I am anxious to hear how you proceed.

yrs as ever

Robert Southey.


Notes

* Address: To/ G C Bedford Esqr / Exchequer
Postmark: 12 oClock / 11 JU/ 98 NOON
Endorsement: 10 June 1798
MS: Bodleian Library, MS Eng. Lett. c. 23
Unpublished. BACK

[1] St Martin’s Lane, a street in central London, near to Charing Cross. The reference is obscure; it is possibly connected to the maker of patent coffins ‘who lives by St. Martin’s lane’, cited in Southey’s ‘The Surgeon’s Warning’, Poems, 2 vols (Bristol, 1799), II, p. 166. BACK

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August 2011