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712. Robert Southey to Thomas Southey, 1 September 1802 ⁠* 

Dear Tom

I write you my first letter of annunciation. Yesterday evening you had a niece born. she will be christened Margaret Edith – I cannot spare either of the names. Edith is as well as possible – the child fat & quiet – properly disposed to eating & feeding & sleeping.

And now the way is clear before me & I can calculate upon my movements. Cumberland will be my best home. you do not seem quite to understand the cause why I & Mr Corry have seperated. my situation was only necess necessary during war – & the peace happily broke out just after I had accepted it. [1]  he wished to keep me as tutor to his son [2]  – that situation office was one which I did not think it would be either proper or prudent to accept. because I have the hope of getting a situation in some embassy one of these days – & withal that employment would rather have retarded than forwarded – & because I know my time & my powers ought to be more honourably deployed.

I am now ready to accompany you into Wales. – If it be agreable to my Uncle I should wish to pay my respects to him before my departure from this part of England. tell him so – & then – if he pleases I will join you at Taunton – & we may cross from Minehead or Watchett –

God bless you –

yr affectionate brother

Robert Southey.


Do’nt you hear the child? said Mary [3]  yesterday just after its xxx birth – I listened – & it was Mr Fox’s parrot [4]  calling father.


Sept 1. 1802.

Joe [5]  is not troublesome. he has received a great accession of names lately – I have found out that he is worth six & thirty shillings.


Notes

* Address: To/ Thomas Southey Esqr/ with John Southey Esqr/ The Cottage/ near/ Taunton./ Single
Postmark: [partial] BRISTOL/ AUG [illegible]0 [illegible]802
Endorsement: sponsors
MS: British Library, Add MS 30927
Unpublished.
Dating note: Incorrectly postmarked ‘AUG’, the letter has the authorial dating of 1 September 1802. BACK

[1] Southey heard of his post with Isaac Corry on 26 September 1801, and Britain and France signed ‘Preliminary Articles of Peace’ on 1 October 1801. BACK

[2] William Corry (c. 1786-1853). BACK

[3] Either a servant or Southey’s sister-in-law Mary Lovell. BACK

[4] Charles Fox (c. 1740-1809; DNB), poet, orientalist and parrot-owner. BACK

[5] Tom Southey’s dog. BACK

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Published @ RC

August 2011