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786. Robert Southey to Charles Watkin Williams Wynn, [c. 26 May 1803] ⁠* 

Dear Wynn

To your ? inclosing the proof I thus reply. Amadis [1]  fills four volumes. the Annual Review [2]  was advertised for publication early in this present month. I shall come to London as soon as I receive certain commissions from my Uncle to be there executed. the House at Hereford has been let under its value for three years. the picture is Keenans [3]  own.

The inclosed is a true story, or else there have been lying historians in the world & the Pope is not infallible. [4]  You have seen Garci Ferrandez [5]  – & I will send you in my next a ballad of K Ramiro. [6]  In my capacity of Poet Laureat to the Morning Post I shall write more of these things & perhaps one day make a volume of them under the title of Romances of Spanish History. [7] 

Tell me some politics. I am damning the French impudence like every body else – but the treaty of Amiens [8]  was a foolish business – & this is the fruits of it. I am trembling for Lisbon – next Autumn my history will be so far advanced as to make a voyage there desirable on that score – & I am almost afraid that this poor carcase of mine will need the help of that climate sooner.

God bless you

R S.


Notes

* Address: To/ C W Williams Wynn Esqr. M.P./ Lincolns Inn/ London
Postmark: [partial] BRISTOL/ MAY 26
Endorsements: May 26 1803; Mr Wynn
MS: National Library of Wales, MS 4811D
Unpublished. BACK

[1] Southey’s translation of Amadis of Gaul (1803). BACK

[2] Annual Review for 1802, 1 (1803). BACK

[3] John Keenan (fl. c. 1780–1819), Irish portrait painter. His portrait of Southey was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1803. BACK

[4] Southey’s enclosure has not survived, but was probably ‘Queen Urraca, and the Five Martyrs of Morocco’, Morning Post, 1 September 1803; see Southey to Wynn, [early June] 1803, Letter 791. BACK

[5] ‘Garci Ferrandez’ was dated ‘Bristol, 1801’ in Southey’s Poetical Works of Robert Southey, 10 vols (London, 1837-1838), VI, p. 121. However, it does not seem to have been published until nearly a decade after its composition, first appearing in the Edinburgh Annual Register for 1809, 2 vols (Edinburgh, 1811), II, pp. 637-641. BACK

[6] ‘King Ramiro’, Morning Post, 9 September 1803. BACK

[7] This project was not realised. BACK

[8] The Treaty of Amiens was signed on 25 March 1802. It had produced a brief respite in the Anglo-French conflict that had been raging since 1793. BACK

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Published @ RC

August 2011