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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1793.17
Epitaph on General Custine[1]
Anon
The Cambridge Intelligencer (October 5, 1793)

Here lies an headless General—(I'll say dead)
As many living Generals want an head.
One morn, whilst dressing (be that morn forgot)
He turn'd his orders into Papillotes[2]
His side-locks curl'd so smart; but poor Custine,
Remember'd not he had an head between.
Fate came, the slightest orders to recall,
And with the curls, alas! took head and all.


Notes

1. Adam de Custine was executed by the French for negligence after the Allies took Condé and Valenciennes in July, 1793.

2. [Author's note]: "One of the charges against CUSTINE was his having said that he papered his hair with the Decrees he did not approve of."

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Published @ RC

September 2004