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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1793.18
Translation of "Pax Bello Potior,"
A Latin Poem, in the European
Magazine for July 1793.
Peace More Desirable Than War.

"W. R. N."
The European Magazine, XXIV (October 1793), p. 301

Grant us, O God! great Ruler of the Skies!
    That which our love to thee will much increase,
The source from which life's choicest treasures rise,
    The first of human blessings,—heav'n-born Peace.

Beneath her shade Science her views extends,
    Cities and people with their laws improve;
Justice, her sister Virtue's rights defends,
    And reigns with them in dignity and love.

But where mad War is, thence no good can spring,
    The Laws grow dumb, Religion dormant lies;
Probity feels, alas! a venom'd sting,
    Droops her fair form, and disregarded dies.

May Heaven favour this our native land,
    Each social blessing may her sons enjoy;
May George with golden Peace reign hand in hand,
    His power of doing good with zeal employ.

Ipswich.


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Published @ RC

September 2004