1793.4 - "Sonnet to Rational Liberty"

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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1793.4
Sonnet to Rational Liberty
"Dr. Mavor"
[William Fordyce Mavor][1]
The Gentleman's Magazine, LXIII (March 1793), p. 263

On reading the horrid acts of the Paris Mob.

By Dr. Mavor.

Dearer than life, than love more sweet,
    Of every joy the source, the zest!
Thee, LIBERTY! I fondly greet,
    Thy genuine spirit fires my breast.

No tyrant's frown, no traitor's harlot smile,
    My free born soul shall awe, my sense
        shall ne'er beguile.
Rais'd on the throne of LAW and RIGHT,
O ever shield thy favourite land!
    While Anarchy, with wild affright,
Flies to GALLIA's frantic strand.
O check these scenes of dire uproar—
    Revenge thy prostituted name!
And far, O far, from BRITAIN'S shore
Drive the foul deeds that clothe thy charms
    with shame.


Notes

1. William Fordyce Mavor (1758-1837) was the instructor of the children of the Duke of Marlborough. A compiler of educational works, Mavor invented a system of shorthand. He wrote numerous travel books, books for children, scientific works, histories, etc. His Poems in 8 volumes were published in 1793. He also wrote under the pseudonym Martyn. See DNB.

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Published @ RC

September 2004