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British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism 1793-1815, by Betty T. Bennet, Edited by Orianne Smith

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1794.21
Hymn To The Guillotine
"Peter Pindar, Esq."[1]
[John Wolcot]
The Scots Magazine, LVI (December 1794), p. 774

    Daughter of Liberty! whose knife
    So busy chops the threads of life,
And frees from cumbrous clay the spirit;
    Ah! why alone shall Gallia feel
    The beauties of thy pond'rous steel?
Why must not Britain mark thy merit?

    Hark! 'tis the dungeon's groan I hear;
    And lo, a squalid band appear,
With sallow cheek, and hollow eye!
    Unwilling, lo, the neck they bend;
    Yet, through thy pow'r, their terrors end,
And with their heads the sorrows fly.

    O let us view thy lofty grace;
    To Britons shew thy blushing face,
And bless Rebellion's life—tir'd train!
    Joy to my soul! she's on her way,
    Led by her dearest friends, Dismay,
Death, and the Devil, and Tom Paine!


Notes

1. Pseudonym of John Wolcot (1738-1819).

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September 2004

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